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  2. By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) Even after a relatively milder stroke, people can be left with challenges that go beyond the physical, researchers say. Their study, of nearly 1,200 stroke survivors, found that physical limitations were the most common issue patients reported. But many patients also said they had difficulty with essential thinking skills -- such as planning and organizing -- while others struggled with changes in their "social role." For the most part, these were patients who had not been severely disabled by their stroke. Most were able to walk without help, and many could take care of their usual daily activities on their own. But even mild disability after a stroke can create "hidden" problems that affect patients' quality of life, according to Dr. Irene Katzan, lead researcher on the study. "Findings like these can help people better understand the breadth of what stroke survivors face," said Katzan, a neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic. The findings were based on Cleveland Clinic patients, average age 62, who had suffered a stroke, typically within the past few months. They completed standard questionnaires to gauge how they were faring in their daily lives. Overall, difficulties with physical functioning were most common: About 63 percent of patients scored "meaningfully" worse on that scale, versus the average for the general population. Similarly, 58 percent scored worse when it came to their satisfaction with their social roles. Those types of issues are understandable, according to Dr. Joel Stein, chairman of rehabilitation and regenerative medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. "Imagine if you were head of the household and used to managing the finances, and now you can't," said Stein, who is also an American Stroke Association spokesman. He was not involved with the study. During stroke rehab, Stein explained, the first priority is to address the "basic aspects of what a person needs to get back home safely." Over the longer term, he said, the goals keep shifting, and other issues get attention, such as screening for and treating depression. With difficulties like dealing with social changes, Stein noted, "not all help has to come from the medical domain." Families and friends, he said, can help by keeping stroke patients socially engaged. Something as simple as seeing the grandkids could make a big difference in a patient's quality of life, according to Stein. "Stroke recovery," he stressed, "is not only about getting people the right pills and right therapies." Another common issue, the study found, was trouble with "executive function" -- mental skills such as planning, organizing and focusing attention. Just under 46 percent of patients scored worse than the general population when it came to those abilities. There is no "magic pill" that will bring those skills back, Katzan said. But, she added, people can learn strategies for dealing with any deficits. Some stroke survivors did have problems with fatigue, depression and anxiety, though those issues were relatively less common. Depression screening is a standard part of stroke rehabilitation. But, Katzan said, the study findings suggest that executive function and difficulty with social adjustments may need more attention. Patients did vary in how they fared: Those who'd had the mildest strokes -- with "minimal" to no disabling symptoms -- were typically doing as well as the general population in all health aspects the study measured. Meanwhile, women tended to fare worse than men when it came to physical functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue. And low-income patients were generally doing worse than those with higher household incomes. Those differences might be partly related to a lack of help, according to Stein. Female stroke patients may be more likely than men to live alone, for instance. And low-income patients are unlikely to be able to afford any paid help. For patients and families, Katzan and Stein said, the takeaway is that they should not just "live with" difficulties that arise during stroke recovery, but should bring them to their doctor's attention. Family members can help, Katzan said, by going with patients to their doctor's appointments and bringing up any concerns. The study was published online March 28 in the journal Neurology. More information The American Stroke Association has more on post-stroke rehabilitation. SOURCES: Irene Katzan, M.D., neurologist, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio; Joel Stein, M.D., chair, rehabilitation and regenerative medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and physiatrist-in-chief, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City; March 28, 2018, Neurology, online Last Updated: Mar 28, 2018 Copyright ©2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
  3. taking time for a mental break can be a good thing.. I'm so happy you're back
  4. that is so true :)
  5. By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even after a relatively milder stroke, people can be left with challenges that go beyond the physical, researchers say. Their study, of nearly 1,200 stroke survivors, found that physical limitations were the most common issue patients reported. But many patients also said they had difficulty with essential thinking skills -- such as planning and organizing -- while others struggled with changes in their "social role." For the most part, these were patients who had not been severely disabled by their stroke. Most were able to walk without help, and many could take care of their usual daily activities on their own. But even mild disability after a stroke can create "hidden" problems that affect patients' quality of life, according to Dr. Irene Katzan, lead researcher on the study. "Findings like these can help people better understand the breadth of what stroke survivors face," said Katzan, a neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic. The findings were based on Cleveland Clinic patients, average age 62, who had suffered a stroke, typically within the past few months. They completed standard questionnaires to gauge how they were faring in their daily lives. Overall, difficulties with physical functioning were most common: About 63 percent of patients scored "meaningfully" worse on that scale, versus the average for the general population. Similarly, 58 percent scored worse when it came to their satisfaction with their social roles. Those types of issues are understandable, according to Dr. Joel Stein, chairman of rehabilitation and regenerative medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. "Imagine if you were head of the household and used to managing the finances, and now you can't," said Stein, who is also an American Stroke Association spokesman. He was not involved with the study. During stroke rehab, Stein explained, the first priority is to address the "basic aspects of what a person needs to get back home safely." Over the longer term, he said, the goals keep shifting, and other issues get attention, such as screening for and treating depression. With difficulties like dealing with social changes, Stein noted, "not all help has to come from the medical domain." Families and friends, he said, can help by keeping stroke patients socially engaged. Something as simple as seeing the grandkids could make a big difference in a patient's quality of life, according to Stein. "Stroke recovery," he stressed, "is not only about getting people the right pills and right therapies." Another common issue, the study found, was trouble with "executive function" -- mental skills such as planning, organizing and focusing attention. Just under 46 percent of patients scored worse than the general population when it came to those abilities. There is no "magic pill" that will bring those skills back, Katzan said. But, she added, people can learn strategies for dealing with any deficits. Some stroke survivors did have problems with fatigue, depression and anxiety, though those issues were relatively less common. Depression screening is a standard part of stroke rehabilitation. But, Katzan said, the study findings suggest that executive function and difficulty with social adjustments may need more attention. Patients did vary in how they fared: Those who'd had the mildest strokes -- with "minimal" to no disabling symptoms -- were typically doing as well as the general population in all health aspects the study measured. Meanwhile, women tended to fare worse than men when it came to physical functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue. And low-income patients were generally doing worse than those with higher household incomes. Those differences might be partly related to a lack of help, according to Stein. Female stroke patients may be more likely than men to live alone, for instance. And low-income patients are unlikely to be able to afford any paid help. For patients and families, Katzan and Stein said, the takeaway is that they should not just "live with" difficulties that arise during stroke recovery, but should bring them to their doctor's attention. Family members can help, Katzan said, by going with patients to their doctor's appointments and bringing up any concerns. The study was published online March 28 in the journal Neurology. More information The American Stroke Association has more on post-stroke rehabilitation. SOURCES: Irene Katzan, M.D., neurologist, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio; Joel Stein, M.D., chair, rehabilitation and regenerative medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and physiatrist-in-chief, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York City; March 28, 2018, Neurology, online Last Updated: Mar 28, 2018 Copyright ©2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
  6. Thank you! I too, have missed you all! Has been way too long! I will have to start a thread about what’s been going on...
  7. phones and laptops need to be removed from reach while you are drugged! Glad it went well. Hope the incisions heal well and quickly!
  8. Nice to see you back Janelle!!
  9. For unplanned hospital visits you expect a certain level of medication chaos. It's when you go in for a scheduled procedure and they won't let you have your meds even though you bought them in with you because "the doctor has not written it up yet" It makes me cross as, thankfully mine are not pain meds so it nuisance value only. You'd think they are more careful with pain meds as timing is so critical with those and you need to have them before you get breakthrough pain as it's so much harder to solve existing pain than to prevent it occuring. Pam you got through this and you will again. I just wish you didn't have to suffer. But the world is full of silly people who can't or won't plan ahead.
  10. Yesterday
  11. It is always such chaos when you go to the hospital, here too, and not having the right meds is typical. Sorry the home had messed it up too. Hopefully you will get the proper medication you need and be able to settle to a better life for a while.
  12. Welcome back, we have all missed you! Deigh
  13. wow Kelli : Its amazing what these doctors can fix, looks so complicated, glad all went well & you are home resting. hope to see you soon grandma lol Asha
  14. Close to 4 years now and still improving, it's slow and still hard work but I'll suddenly realize I can do something I couldn't before. Patience is your ally, as is sweat but improvement is always possible.
  15. You and your issues being a survivor no matter how small or big are valid. I am so happy you guys are sharing. It's healing.
  16. So glad you are done and resting and healing. Thanks for the update and blessings for a successfully quick rebound.
  17. I'm pulling for you Kelli and sending you positive vibes.
  18. I felt the same way when I came here. (still do) After reading what so many others have been through, compared with what I am going through makes my problems seem miniscule. I guess no matter how small they are, they are still real and a problem for me. I feel that at my age most of my life is gone anyways. It would really be nice though if the rest was a pleasant experience. Too much to ask for? I have a high school buddy who raised my spirits right after my stroke. He called me to wish me a happy birthday ( which was two days after my stroke) and that is the first time I heard that he had a stroke at the age of 19. I was in Nam at that time so was not in contact with him. That was in 1966 and although I had seen him numerous times since I never knew that he had a stroke. That pretty much showed that in some cases recovery is possible and gave me hope. As mine wasn't as bad as many, I still have a lot of hope. Things seem to get better each day. Prayers for you too. Dave
  19. HR from The Arc contacted me yesterday and I replied with what she asked and I had to apologize for I didn't really make sense for I was still under anesthesia. Thankfully she was a good sport about it lol
  20. fast no more

    Yesterday I finally had my ablation on my heart to stop the rapid heart beat. I wasn't nervous for my cousin, who is a cardiac nurse and also had this done, walked me through everything. It didn't hit me that I remember them adding the adrenalin to make my heart race so they could find out where the 'road block' was. Basically, you have two tracks that the electrical currents in your heart go around that keep your heart function. So Imagine you have two tracks above each other but the one with that contains the faster of the current (: if you get excited or caffeine your heart beats faster and you also have a slow lane that keeps the balance- ) well one of mine didn't have a complete track because one of the tracks had extra muscle that made the faster currents speed faster in half the space. When the current would get trapped in the smaller loo[p, my hear rate would jump to 240+ beats per min. SOOO.. When I felt them making my hear to go fast, my jaw started to hurt, I began to sweat , same as always, but when it stopped I thought they stopped the medicine for I didn't feel the usual chest pains but it just stopped beating fast. That was the time when he performed the procedure and fixed the problem.. it is amazing. The down side is they went into both side of my groin so pain, no driving, no swimming, no lifting.. To most people that might sound like a day off but no driving to my Aunts house to swim in her pool.. But I can drink coffee.. but I'm still scared but he ( the Dr) said it was textbook so no issues. Same day.. Long day. My parents and I left my house at 4:30a for the 90 min drive.. put on to prep at 7:15a wheeled into the OR 8am finished at 12pm.. post op full bedrest until 4:00pm.. leave hospital 4:30pm (Philadelphia Rush Hour) made it home by 6:45p.. My son, 15, stayed home with the cats.. don't blame him.. I slept partially seated for my pelvic area was so sore.. Better today.. Apparently I emailed people while still drugged lol
  21. Welcome to StrokeNet. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  22. Welcome to StrokeNet. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  23. Welcome to StrokeNet. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  24. Congratulations!
  25. Hi Watson Give it time and look after yourself. My stroke was just over 2 1/2 years ago, and I still see improvements. There were significant improvements in the first three of four months (like getting my left leg to behave), and I started to adapt my routines to my new self. I was back at work within two months (I'm self-employed, so no sick leave) and look back in horror at the mess that I made in that time. I managed to lose most of my customers (which I would have done anyway), but I think that overall it was probably a good thing from rehab perspective. Yes, you're weak and probably easily fatigued and a burden. Most people will want to help (at least for a while); friends and family will want to keep on helping. It's your boss' problem to deal with work distribution and whether or not to get a locum for you. I also get frustrated and anxious and feel like a burden, but friends and family have made it clear that they would rather have me as I am than not have me at all. I don't always believe them, but it helps to keep me going. From my experience, I would suggest that you try to return to work once you get the headaches under control and once you are able to get some sleep (which may take time; my sleep is still messed up). Make it clear that you are still an invalid, that you'll work slowly and probably cannot do everything, but that by actually working you will probably improve faster. Of course, this is all based on a sample size of one, your mileage may vary. Good luck, and keep talking. This is a great place to hang out. paul
  26. Hi Dave Welcome to the club that no-one wants to join. It's exclusive, the cost of membership is high, but it has some of the nicest people you will ever meet as members. [ disclaimer -- I am (was?) an engineer, and am useless at "touchy-feely" ] I had similar experience about 2 1/2 years ago. I won't bore you with the details, suffice to say that however "mild" your stroke my be compared to others, it is still a stroke and is still a massive insult to your brain and your self. From my experience: give yourself lots of time and leeway to recover, push yourself to try to overcome deficits (and keep pushing, improvement mostly takes time and repetition). The good news is that things can and do improve. The biggest factors, as far as I can tell, is time and repeatedly trying to do stuff. My left leg used to drag and turn outwards (proprioception rather than motor issues), so I had to remind myself to glance down and see what my foot was doing. After a month or two it started to behave, and is OK now unless I get very tired. I walk and run as much as I can, and keep taking quick peeks to make sure that it is still working properly. Some issues take far longer to improve. My memory is still atrocious (like 5th percentile), but is better than it was two years ago. However, over time one can learn compensation strategies -- I keep copious notes, use my phone calendar and to-do lists a lot, explain to people I meet that I'm unlikely to remember them and why that is that case, so that they are not insulted the next time I bump into them. Again, I try to remember stuff before i dig through my notes ad diaries. I think that it is helping a bit, but cannot measure easily. And some will never improve. I am partially blind, and the visual fields have remained rock-solid constant since my stroke (I have to get them done every year for my driver's license). I have learned to compensate, and flick my eyes around more so that I don't bump into things. Take care of yourself. Take lots of rest breaks, or snooze during the early afternoon. Try not to be to hard on yourself, buy do keep pushing. And feel free to vent, ask for help, or anything else. That's what makes this place what it is. paul
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