becky1

Stroke Survivor - female
  • Content count

    377
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    United States

About becky1

  • Rank
    Mentor
  • Birthday 08/27/1956

Shared Information

  • Stroke Anniversary (first stroke)
    02-03-2007
  • How did you find us?
    Website Link

Registration Information

  • First Name
    becky
  • State
    WEST VIRGINIA
  • Country
    United States
  1. Scott, I looked at the video you posted, and all I can say is "Wow"! I admit that I probably did not understand all that I was seeing, but it seemed to require a lot of precision. Good for you,too, in being open to trying something new. Becky
  2. Another shining example of truth being "stranger than fiction." Becky
  3. Pam, I have dysarthria, which makes my speech difficult to understand at times. So, while I don't have your problems communicating, I have others , and I so understand your frustration. When it comes to questions that you want to ask, I think that making a list is a good idea. Maybe if you practise them before your appt., it would help. For everything else, explain that your stroke has affected your ability to communicate, and ask doc if you can email your questions later, when you can process your questions. Good luck, Becky
  4. Janelle, I had the exact same reaction as you when my doc told me a few years ago that I was diabetic. When I got over the shock, I got angry; No one on either side of my family was diabetic, so why was I? Diabetes tends to run in families. So, I threw myself into research. I found out that taking statins can cause diabetes. Some cholesterol drugs are statins. I had been taking the same statin for 7 yrs post-stroke! As luck would have it, we moved to a different state a few months later. I ran out all of my meds, including my statin. It was 6 mos. before we located a new doc, and I actually got in to see her. So, I was "medless" for about 6 mos. And, guess what? I wasn't diabetic any more. But, my bad cholesterol was having a field day, and I was put on a milder statin because I raised my concerns. That was 4 yrs. ago, and I'm not diabetic yet, but I won't be surprised if I test positive for diabetes eventually. I'm not suggesting that you stop taking it if you're on a statin, but you may want to do your own research, and talk to your doc. While researching, I also found out that you really can manage diabetes with exercise and diet. There are skads of recipes for diabetes on- line. I'm glad you already have a nutritionist, as that will help a lot. I expected to find a lot of dietary restrictions, and was pleasantly surprised to find that the only major restriction was sugar, which I really missed, sugar addict that I am! Most of the diets for diabetics that I read about were low, or no sugar; low carb, low fat; just wholesome food, with emphasis on fruits and veggies and not meat. You can do this, Janelle. It's pretty straight-forward, and some of it you may already be doing. Good luck, Becky
  5. Janelle, I hope that no one comes to Strokenet expecting to be entertained. There's nothing wrong with humor, in fact, it can be quite healthy. More than once, I've read something here that's evoked a LOL response from me. But, I also think that if you're having a good day, it's wrong to give someone a totally unrealistic, positive, or optimistic response. Or, if having a bad day, to be overly negative in our responses. But, I don't want you,or anyone, to stay away because of how you feel. It's just my opinion, but I'd like for you to do whatever feels best to you, but be aware that what kind of day you've had may color your responses. Becky
  6. Pam, I know that this is incredibly painful to you, it would to me, too. But try to see the whole picture: This is a young, first-time Mom (I'm guessing about the "young" part) whose new baby has additional to newborn needs, and who now has to have major surgery. Oh, and don't forget to add that she also has postpartum depression. That's a lot for anyone to handle. I think that she's just feeling overwhelmed, and needs time to regroup. I think she'll be more open to you in time. Send her flowers, and let her know you love her, and you're always there for her, and try to let her decide when, and in what way, to let you into her life. JMO. Prayers for all, Becky
  7. I 'm glad you're back, too, Janelle. Becky
  8. Scott, I have a lot of stroke-related issues-confined to a wheelchair, problems with eyes and ears, etc., but I consider myself fortunate because I don't have CPS. Like Linnie, I can't imagine, and I'm inspired by all of you to keep up"the good fight". I hope that you can draw inspiration, and keep up the good fight too. What about a pump, like Steve has- would that help? Are there any teaching hospitals nearby? Or medical schools? If your doc can't locate a neuro for you, try broadening your search to other areas. Good luck, Becky
  9. Everyone covered just about everything, so just want to add my "Welcome!" When the going gets tough, hang in there, and come to Strokenet. Good luck with everything. Becky
  10. Me, again. I forgot to add that there are other things that you can look into to help you: Baces- Bioness and Monomo. Google them as each requires a trained therapist to assess your appropriateness for the brace, fitting, and follow-up. I think both websites tell you how to locate the therapist nearest to you. TENS Unit: Talk to your PT if you have one. Chemical: Baclofen-This is in pill form. I take this, and it's great for tone. One side affect is tiredness,which for me is extreme. But, VERY effective. Botox injections: I've never had these, but understand that you need to be in therapy when getting Botox, since its great effects only last for about 3 mos. Get this from your neurologist YOU MAY HAVE PROBLEMS GETTING ANY OF THESE SO RECENTLY AFTER YOUR STROKE, BUT THEY MIGHT BE USEFUL DOWN THE ROAD. ALSO,I'M NOT A DOC, AND I'M SURE THERE ARE OTHER OPTIONS TO TRY. Becky
  11. Schuang74, You are way too new to the stroke world to be giving up. Stroke recovery is VERY slow. No matter what kind of stroke we've had, or how bad, we've all experienced slow recoveries, which has sent us into bouts of depression, and made us feel useless, and lost. We've all had the experience of working on something for weeks, or months with no sign of progress. It's very, very frustrating. You have lots of company. You will see some deficits get better, and some will not improve much, if at all. No one seems to improve all deficits 100%. But there may be improvements that are so close to pre-stroke level that no one but you will know that it's not 100%. And, there's no way to predict which category your hand is in. It seems that all you can do is to get as much Occupational Therapy as you can. Do your exercises at home, and use your hand as much as you can. And pray for patience. Please don't give up yet. It's just too early for that Becky
  12. I love the idea Heather has of bringing flowers! Or, the next time you see them, give each a big bear hug, and tell them "Becky said she sends a hug; you're good people who deserve more than words can ever say." Or, thereabouts, in your own words. Becky
  13. How nice of them to do this for you! There aren't many who would. If you can, show up one night with a bag of their "old" containers in one hand, with a bag of new ones in the other hand. Becky
  14. Tracy, Confrontation, or being assertive, is not easy for a lot of people, stroke, or no stroke. And if you have had a stroke, you have to add its problems into the mix. And, sometimes that just doesn't work out too well. The trick is to gain control of your emotions before they gain control of you. That's easier said, than done, I know. So, the next time you see yourself heading down that road, remove yourself from the situation before you get emotionally overwhelmed. Go to the bathroom, to the kitchen to get a drink of water, or to check on something cooking, or wherever, just to buy yourself some time. While away, calm down best you can, and gather your thoughts: What are they saying? What do you want to say? Keep it simple in your head so you'll remember it better. Or, you can say to the person, "I can't/won't/don't have time to talk about that right now." Then, when you're away from that person, go over what you want to say, and bring it up to them when you're ready. Good luck, Becky
  15. Ray, that's wonderful news! You are an inspiration! Keep on keeping on! Becky