My Mom 58 and just had a stroke 3 weeks ago!


Recommended Posts

Hello, my name is Leslie and my mom had a stroke about 3 weeks ago. She is 58 years old, she has no paralysis, swallowing is fine...but her eye site is a wonkey and her short term memory is shady. She can not remeber the year at all. Her speach is also a slurded. She is very childlike so to speak, getting off topic very easily if she is distracted. She says very inappropriate thing at times as well. She has always been very light hearted person but it seems to have amplified with the stroke. She is in rehab now and doing very well I think, but how do I know if this is normal? Anyone have any tips on this sort of behavior? Will it get better with time as the brain heals its self? Thanks for any comments you have! Leslie

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello & Welcome, Leslie

Your mom and I are the same age (58). I stroked 18 months ago and with time, things do improve. It is at times a much slower process than one could imagine but nevertheless any improvement to me is worth the time and effort.

 

My deficits are my left leg & arm.

 

You will find this site a wealth of good information and a great resource.

 

Stessie

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Leslie, Welcome to strokenet, I will try to clear things up a bit for you. 3 weeks is not very long at all when you think of stroke. What you mention are all common signs after a stroke. It is good that there is no paralysis. There is probably still a lot of swelling in her brain. When the swelling goes away it is possible that some of the signs you mention will go away as well. A stroke can be very different from person to person. Not every stroke is the same and all peple are different. It can take up to six months for swelling to go down. Your mom's doctor or therapists would be better to answer specific questions on whether her behavior is normal. And yes it will get better as her brain heals. She might not come back like she was prestroke but definately she will be better. The road to recovery is a very long one. I am 24 years post stroke and I still see changes. One very important fact is never give up because there is a chance that there will be changes for many years to come. No matter what anyone says there is always hope. You can come back anytime and as often as you like. I am sure other survivors will also share their experience with you. Here you will get answers from the horse's mouth, We know because we have all been there either as survivors or caregivers. So again welcome and keep us posted on your mom's recovery, we care

 

 

 

Marie-Claire

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the welcomes. I guess 3 weeks is not a long time, but it feels like forever already. Her PTs and OTs keep saying how great she is doing and what huge improvments she is making in such a short time. Her stroke was caused by untreated high blood pressure in the themic (sp?) part of her brain. She shows signs of previous strokes also. Her BP was 260/140 when they picked her up it is still high (150/80) but they say they are keeping it high for now to help blood flow the affected area. Anyone anything about that? Does it make sense that her memory, speech and eye site get worse when she is tired or just wakes up? Thanks again to everyone for your support. It is good to have someone to talk to. Leslie

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Leslie,

 

Welcome to the site. Sorry to hear about your Mom. Three weeks is not a long time in terms of stroke recovery.

 

It generally takes 6 months for the swelling in the brain to decrease. When she is sleeping, her brain is healing. You will see that, when she is tired, her deficits may be further enhanced.

 

As you have questions, sometimes it is easy to forget questions you want to ask once you see the doctor - perhaps writing things down will help.

 

We're not experts here, but we've all, one way or another, have walked the road you and your Mom are starting to travel.

 

Please remember, you are not alone - we're right beside you.

 

God Bless

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Leslie!

 

My mom had a stroke on June 20th when she was 54, and she is showing the same conditions as your mom. Physically, my mom does not show any paralysis, but she is affected mentally; short term memory, long term memory, and cognitive parts are affected. I would suggest that you try some tests like have her count money or say alphabet to see if she can do those things correctly.

 

The key in dealing with strokes is patience. Take it one day at a time and try to be light-hearted even if you are frustrated out of your mind. The brain is a very mysterious organ, so anything can happen. I know when I see my mom, some days there seems to be jumps in improvements and some days seem like there were some steps taken backwards. In the end, just have hope and give your mom plenty of encouragement and motivation and she will improve.

Link to post
Share on other sites

:welcome: SURE LESLIE,LIKE EVERYONE SAY SHE IS VERY NEW TO AND THE STROKE WORLD, BE SURE THAT SHE DOES EVERYTHING,THAT SHE SUPPOSE,TO DO AND TRY TO EASE HER WORRY,BECAUSE THAT WILL SLOW THE PROCESS,THREE IS VERY EARLY, YOUR MOM WILL DO FIND AS TIME GOES BUY, GOD BLESS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Leslie,

 

Have you spoken with her neurologist to ask where her stroke was in the brain? I can tell you that my husband had a stroke 10/25/04 and he has very similar challenges as your mom. He has a condition called hemionopsia which means, in his case, he sees nothing to the right of mid-nose. He also lost his ability to read and write. His short-term memory was profoundly affected. His cognitive abilities were also damaged - meaning he has difficulty understanding and following directions. Another deficit he has is that he cannot sequence. If you ask him the steps in making a sandwich or pot of coffee he would not be able to name the steps necessary to complete the job. He still sometimes says things that come to his mind rather than keeping the thoughts to himself. I remember that it was really quite difficult when his disabilities were invisible - especially the eyesight. He has never been able to grasp the concept of scanning to compensate for his vision field cut. I soon learned to walk on his right side to help him avoid bumping into people - or walls.

 

I hope your mom continues to progress well through her rehabilitation. I remember Bill's first year post stroke. It was filled with hospital stays, a surgery, another stroke and rehab. It seemed as though he would take one step forward and fall two behind. However, he slowly got stronger and the "emergencies" became fewer. It is exciting that he has not been hospitalized at all during the past year!!!

 

Please do keep us posted on ow she is doing. If we caregivers can give you and advice we would be happy to share our experiences with you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for all the nice thoughts and warm welcomes. Mom is coming home from rehab on November 3rd. I live out of town (I don't think I have said that in other post) and my dad will be caring for her for the first week home. I am little nervous but all in all I am so proud of my mom and the strength that she has and will that she has to get better. I will be back in a week to care for her for awhile and the a care taker will take over as my dad works out of town full time. What should I inform a caretaker about besides the obvious things? Any tips?

 

I test her alot about dates, times and locations. She is doing better, we have good days and bad days but all in all she is doing a great job. I feel more encouraged about a good recovery once the brain has healed and the swelling is gone down. She can not remember the year to save her soul and we joke all the time about me saying..."What year is it"...she says I should get a tatoo ( I don't have any to date) that says that. We are very light hearted naturally and she has never lost her sence of humor.

 

Has anyone ever seen the problem of one not being able to move there eyes down? She has a very hard time looking down like in her lap. It is kinda crazy. It makes her crazy too.

 

Thanks again, it is great to know you guys are out there.

 

Leslie

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi again, Leslie -

 

You know, I think there are as many different little issues after stroke as there are brains! Whatever your mom's deficits are, it sounds to me as though her great attitude will help her get past it.

 

The first few days after she comes home will be stressful for both her and your dad. They will get the hang of it though. Bill was 55 when he had his two major strokes. We are now 59 and we get along very well.

 

I'll be looking forward to hearing good things!!

 

Warmly,

Ann

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Leslie and Welcome to Strokenet,

 

In three weeks you'll not see alot of improvement, as this is only the start of her stroke journey.

There are so many issues with stroke and different kinds, but what you're mentioning here is generally normal as others will tell you. It usually takes six months for the swelling in the brain to decrease, if she's tired you'll see more pronounced symptoms so let her sleep as long as she wants because her brain is healing.

Please keep us updated on her progress, and remember that we don't just support the survivor, we support the whole family.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an update... Mom is doing well I have not seen her in a week now and I am looking forward to going back and spending another week with her in TX to help her and her new caregiver. We still can't get the BP under control. It is still high, she has seen the Dr. for it this week and getting blood work next week to try and find the problem. Slowly things are getting better for her, she is feeling frustrated now because she can't see to type and she can't remember things short term. This morning my dad called me in a panic, she said she had taken her meds, but could not remember which ones she had taken. So we have to put them where she can't get to them for awhile. I know we don't have it as bad as most of you, but this is still really stressful on so many levels. Thanks for all the kind words and help as we go through this journey. Leslie

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just an update... Mom is doing well I have not seen her in a week now and I am looking forward to going back and spending another week with her in TX to help her and her new caregiver. We still can't get the BP under control. It is still high, she has seen the Dr. for it this week and getting blood work next week to try and find the problem. Slowly things are getting better for her, she is feeling frustrated now because she can't see to type and she can't remember things short term. This morning my dad called me in a panic, she said she had taken her meds, but could not remember which ones she had taken. So we have to put them where she can't get to them for awhile. I know we don't have it as bad as most of you, but this is still really stressful on so many levels. Thanks for all the kind words and help as we go through this journey. Leslie

 

 

We understand completly. It's that short term memory, can't remember half an hour later if you took your meds. Why not have her pharmacy bubble package them up...you know the ones for morning in one bubble, lunch ones in another, and the evening in another.... if you mention it to the pharmasist, he'll know what you're talking about.

You can have a whole month bubbled so there can never be a worry if she took them or not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Leslie,

 

Short term memory issues are difficult when it comes to taking our medications. For me I got medication trays - on Sundays then I organize the next weeks worth of meds.

 

Hope the pharmacy can help you as Stu suggested.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to ask about the bubble packing! I want her to gain her independance back but not at the cost of ODing on her meds! I think that is a great way to help her take her meds and stay on track. GREAT thoughts...thanks to you all!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome Leslie! :)

Your Mom is making great improvements and will likely continue to do so. Your question about getting tired and not being able to do things well....when stroke patients get tired most everything gets worse, speech, muscle strenght, everything...but at the same time everything is better when they are rested, that's one of the reasons sleep is so important. Keeping you all in my prayers!! God Bless you all!...........Joy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Hi All, As read my first post to this website I can see the panic in my tone. To all of you going through this as a caregiver...it does get better. Here is an update on my mom.

 

IT has been 7 weeks now since moms stroke. Wow! What a ride this has been and it is not over yet. She has been at home for 3 weeks now and she is doing great. She starts OP Rehab on Monday and they are hopeful that she will continue to improve. I have spent the last week here with her and I can say without a doubt that she has improved a great deal in this short 7 days. Her speech is better, she is starting to try and write some, she is reading, she can take a bath and toilet without someone watching like a hawk, her eyesite is getting better but still really can not look down. The only thing really lagging behind is her short term memory. It is improving but taking longer than other things. We have got the blood preasure controled with meds now and she feels so much better. I dare say she feels better physically than she did pre-stroke. I guess we all would if we had out of control BP for 10+ years and not it was running normal. She ahs also lost about 30 lbs...and that is a good thing for her!

 

So I feel bitter sweet as this is my last day in Texas until Christmas and the care taker takes over today...I want to go home to Colorado, but I want to stay too! IT is very hard. I know she is in great hands, her caretaker is her best friend and neighbor, but it is hard to leave and go home.

 

So thank you all for your kind words and prayers. YOu have helped me ALOT and I will keep you updated on her progress and try to share my stories as much as possible where I think it will help. Chin up everyone and keep looking for the silver lining!

 

Leslie

Link to post
Share on other sites

Leslie,

 

Thank you for this latest update on your Mom. I'm glad her best friend and neighbor will be with her once you leave as caregiver. You're care giving role will continue in another capacity as you check up on her care from Colorado.

 

I'm sure, when you see your Mom again at Christmas, you'll have added pleasure as to her continued recovery from the month you were away from her.

 

Recovery never ever ends though it will slow down.

 

For me, even almost 4 years into recovery, family, who do not see me regularly, can see improvements albeit small ones. Without you being there daily and "hovering" this may hrlp your Mom become even more independent and help her adaptations to live after stroke.

 

God Bless and (((hugs)))

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Leslie,

 

It was so good to hear how your mom is improving. Regarding her short term memory, hopefully she will be shown strategies to help her. She can use sticky notes to help her remember! I'm never without them, believe me - and I'm not the survivor, I'm the caregiver!!

 

It sounds like she has a fantastic attitude. It sure will be good to see her here at the Stroke Network someday!!

 

Ann

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.