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I went to get 12 Botox injections in my right arm (7) and hand (5) yesterday. Hurt like hell, especially my hand. The doctors injected my pectoral muscle too. Anybody have any luck with this type of therapy? I received injections of Botox about four months ago. The doctor told me at the time, I wouldn't be able to come back for at least three months. I was planning on returning until I received a letter from my insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of the procedure. The doctor went to bat for me and I got a phone call from his office saying I got approved. Thoughts? Comments?

ps. I know this ain't the right forum, but I figured I'm a newbie and I can get away with it.

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hi phil yes the insurance will coverbotox if it is used asa chemical used to help spasticity not as a wrinkle reducer so i guess that your doctor simplt informedyour insurance that it was in hopes of eliminate spasticity it is a very common complaints for stroke survivor and yes i have used the botox treatment once for my leg and once for my arm and it does seem to loosen the tightness around that spot

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Phil: Bruce did receive Botox four times during the past year, but his new insurance won't cover it from the Outpatient Clinic. We are now pursing a different way of billing it through the Physiatrist that is doing the Baclofen. Wish us luck-at $2400.00 per visit, it is certainly out of our budget.

 

Yes, Bruce did see a difference. His pec was solid as a rock. After the first injection, OT was finally able to extend the arm and really get it going. After 21 months, however, still no movement arm or hand. In his leg, it helped reduce the spasticity in his thigh and calf, and reduce the clonus while we awaited the Baclofen decision. Reminder, it can take up to a week to kick in and Bruce's lasted only six weeks. But we took anything we could get.

 

Let us know what you experience. Debbie

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Phil,

 

It's great that you could get it and insurance pays. I had no luck with trying to get it done for me here in Texas! I sure hope it works in your case. I understand it does help the muscles, just so darn expensive!

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I went to get 12 Botox injections in my right arm (7) and hand (5) yesterday. Hurt like hell, especially my hand. The doctors injected my pectoral muscle too. Anybody have any luck with this type of therapy? I received injections of Botox about four months ago. The doctor told me at the time, I wouldn't be able to come back for at least three months. I was planning on returning until I received a letter from my insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of the procedure. The doctor went to bat for me and I got a phone call from his office saying I got approved. Thoughts? Comments?

ps. I know this ain't the right forum, but I figured I'm a newbie and I can get away with it.

 

 

Dear Phil~ I've been getting Botox for about a year now. The downside is, you have to wait 3 months between injections. So far, It hasn't made a difference on my curled-up toes, but, he started off with the minimal dose. I have confidence that it will help, if he can only get the dosage right. My injection is in the sole of my foot, so, talk about painful! Check the website for Bioness. Maybe they can help you. I don't know where you live, but, they have places all over. Well, not ALL over. I can't imagine your insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of this. This is a lonely journey we must take.

 

Sorry, I just noticed you were female.

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My spouse has had two Botox injection sessions and the third one is coming up. He has not tolerated needles too much so he is brave to do this. He has spasticity in his hand and arm and has had injections in his shoulder as well for this. It takes about 10 days or so to kick in and then 3 months before another can be given. It helps the muscles in his arm and hand to relax. I think he would have a lot of trouble with his hand curling up otherwise. It is expensive but Medicare covers his treatments.

Julie

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hi phil yes the insurance will coverbotox if it is used asa chemical used to help spasticity not as a wrinkle reducer so i guess that your doctor simplt informedyour insurance that it was in hopes of eliminate spasticity it is a very common complaints for stroke survivor and yes i have used the botox treatment once for my leg and once for my arm and it does seem to loosen the tightness around that spot

Thanks for the reply Ambassdor Lenny. And thanks for the personal story.

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Phil: Bruce did receive Botox four times during the past year, but his new insurance won't cover it from the Outpatient Clinic. We are now pursing a different way of billing it through the Physiatrist that is doing the Baclofen. Wish us luck-at $2400.00 per visit, it is certainly out of our budget.

 

Yes, Bruce did see a difference. His pec was solid as a rock. After the first injection, OT was finally able to extend the arm and really get it going. After 21 months, however, still no movement arm or hand. In his leg, it helped reduce the spasticity in his thigh and calf, and reduce the clonus while we awaited the Baclofen decision. Reminder, it can take up to a week to kick in and Bruce's lasted only six weeks. But we took anything we could get.

 

Let us know what you experience. Debbie

 

Good luck with the billing! I'm already on oral Baclofen. I originally was taking 10mg but I called the doctor when I found out that I was denied for the Botox. He said I could up it to 15mgs so I did with no side effects or than drowsiness. I usually take them at 1000, 1800, and before I go to bed around 2300. I want to up it again to 20mgs-the maximum. Between the Baclofen and the Botox I anticipate great relief. I understand fully that Botox is very expensive. But I had no idea is that expensive. I already have been experiencing relief from my shoulder. I was diagnosed with frozen shoulder the last time I went to the Botox doctor over three months ago. I've been experiencing the shoulder thawing out since I've received the Botox injections over three months ago. Next time, I want the injections in my leg. Is Bruce confined to a wheelchair?

-phildogg

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I went to get 12 Botox injections in my right arm (7) and hand (5) yesterday. Hurt like hell, especially my hand. The doctors injected my pectoral muscle too. Anybody have any luck with this type of therapy? I received injections of Botox about four months ago. The doctor told me at the time, I wouldn't be able to come back for at least three months. I was planning on returning until I received a letter from my insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of the procedure. The doctor went to bat for me and I got a phone call from his office saying I got approved. Thoughts? Comments?

ps. I know this ain't the right forum, but I figured I'm a newbie and I can get away with it.

 

 

Dear Phil~ I've been getting Botox for about a year now. The downside is, you have to wait 3 months between injections. So far, It hasn't made a difference on my curled-up toes, but, he started off with the minimal dose. I have confidence that it will help, if he can only get the dosage right. My injection is in the sole of my foot, so, talk about painful! Check the website for Bioness. Maybe they can help you. I don't know where you live, but, they have places all over. Well, not ALL over. I can't imagine your insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of this. This is a lonely journey we must take.

 

Sorry, I just noticed you were female.

 

 

First of all I'd to clear one thing up, I'm a man baybeedevil.gif .

I had some left over from my last visit so he combined the dose for the maximum. I think he said the maximum is 500mgs. FDA rules and they mandate how much and how often. Twelve injections was quite painful indeed. I could only imagine the pain of the injection of the sole of foot, numnah. The only reason I didn't cry is because this fine, young doctor was working with my Botox doctor. She was from Russia and didn't want her see what lil' bitch I can be when it comes to pain.

I'll have to check the bioness website again but somehow I remember being on their site before. But I'll check it out again.

They did question the "medical necessity" of Botox. They probably question everything. You wouldn't want them to PAY for an unnecessary procedure, would you.

Oh by the way, I live southeast of Cleveland, Ohio.

-phildogg

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My spouse has had two Botox injection sessions and the third one is coming up. He has not tolerated needles too much so he is brave to do this. He has spasticity in his hand and arm and has had injections in his shoulder as well for this. It takes about 10 days or so to kick in and then 3 months before another can be given. It helps the muscles in his arm and hand to relax. I think he would have a lot of trouble with his hand curling up otherwise. It is expensive but Medicare covers his treatments.

Julie

 

Thanks for letting me know that Medicare covers the cost of Botox. We're in a transition phase trying to weighing out the costs and coverage that Cobra allows us and what the medicare/medicaid will cover. I've been on my old insurance until it ran out in November. I've been on Cobra for the past month and not sure if we're gonna pay another month. Like your spouse, I don't like needles. I feeling the effects after only four days. I would hate for it to kick in ten days. But some people feel the effects of Botox, differently. I like to report that I am feeling the effects already. The relaxing of my arm has made the elbow movement much smoother and the shoulder movement is much more relaxed. And where they injected my hand I can't even hold my gripper I hold to keep my hand open. I guess I'll to report to my doctor it does its intended effects.

-phildogg

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Phil: I am glad you are feeling the effects of the Botox so quickly, this is a good sign and of course, you want to continue. Botox decreases the activity of the strong muscle which allows the weak muscle less resistance to work against.

 

Oral Baclofen does not cross the blood-brain barrier well. Only about 1% of the dose actually reaches the muscles, which is why the doses need to be so high. Bruce just finished the Baclofen Intrathecal trial-directly into the spine, where it bypasses the blood-brain. The difference was amazing. The test dose is delivered directly into the spine, by yet another needle (OH NO-lol). The surgery for the Intrathecal pump is pretty elaborate and scary, so we are thinking about it. We met with the surgeon and know the required pre-op tests he needs and will consider this for 2011. Our founder here, Steve Mallory has a pump and I am sure he would be glad to advise you.

 

However it seems to me you are having good results with the Botox and may want to continue with that for a while and see where you improve.

 

Bruce is WC bound only by choice. At five months post stroke he was walking a full city block, twice a day with a long leg brace, quad cane and supervision only. At nine months post stroke he developed severe spasticity of the affected leg. Apparently this is common, but no one had given us the heads up to look for it. We could no longer lock the long leg brace, so he was fitted with an AFO and with the Botox was doing very well at trying to get back to the distance. We even paid for private PT after insurance ran out because he needed more therapy to get him used to the AFO. In December 2009 he basically gave up. We have been one year investigating the Intrathecal pump and getting into the testing program. It was only luck that the Spinal Cord Injury group at our OutPatient posted a seminar on over-spasticity and Bruce happened to see it. He had heard the word so much between PT, Physiatrist and me that he knew enough to point out the poster to me. In the meantime, swimming greatly helps. He is like jelly after his hour work out in the pool and fortunately really enjoys going. We see Neuro tomorrow and I may ask him to up the Baclofen dose as the drowsiness isn't really an issue, since we no longer do PT or OT and I can work the timing around the pool and his work.

 

In getting Bruce first approved for the Botox, his nurse did a fine job with challenging the refusal to pay (insurance just figured it was for cosmetic purposes) and we were approved that same week. We have a new Insurance carrier, who won't even look at the challenge. I can probably challenge through the state, but if someone isn't even going to try, that is not my first priority these days. Good luck and try to continue: Debbie

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I went to get 12 Botox injections in my right arm (7) and hand (5) yesterday. Hurt like hell, especially my hand. The doctors injected my pectoral muscle too. Anybody have any luck with this type of therapy? I received injections of Botox about four months ago. The doctor told me at the time, I wouldn't be able to come back for at least three months. I was planning on returning until I received a letter from my insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of the procedure. The doctor went to bat for me and I got a phone call from his office saying I got approved. Thoughts? Comments?

ps. I know this ain't the right forum, but I figured I'm a newbie and I can get away with it.

 

 

Dear Phil~ I've been getting Botox for about a year now. The downside is, you have to wait 3 months between injections. So far, It hasn't made a difference on my curled-up toes, but, he started off with the minimal dose. I have confidence that it will help, if he can only get the dosage right. My injection is in the sole of my foot, so, talk about painful! Check the website for Bioness. Maybe they can help you. I don't know where you live, but, they have places all over. Well, not ALL over. I can't imagine your insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of this. This is a lonely journey we must take.

 

Sorry, I just noticed you were female.

 

 

First of all I'd to clear one thing up, I'm a man baybeedevil.gif .

I had some left over from my last visit so he combined the dose for the maximum. I think he said the maximum is 500mgs. FDA rules and they mandate how much and how often. Twelve injections was quite painful indeed. I could only imagine the pain of the injection of the sole of foot, numnah. The only reason I didn't cry is because this fine, young doctor was working with my Botox doctor. She was from Russia and didn't want her see what lil' bitch I can be when it comes to pain.

I'll have to check the bioness website again but somehow I remember being on their site before. But I'll check it out again.

They did question the "medical necessity" of Botox. They probably question everything. You wouldn't want them to PAY for an unnecessary procedure, would you.

Oh by the way, I live southeast of Cleveland, Ohio.

-phildogg

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I've been receiving Botox injections for a couple of years. They are most effective after a series of them when they've had time to build up a bit and their effect becomes longer lasting. They are also most effective to regain some movement, aside from just reducing spasticity, when coupled with therapy. The muscles that have become atrophic also need to be stretched back to size. By keeping up with the botox injections to keep it loose and exercising it, you can prevent the muscle from again becoming atrophic and stay ahead of the spasticity.

 

Best of luck with your injections, they do work.

 

Maria :friends:

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hi phil yes i have had botox injections and it did help me it got rid of alot of spasticity for me so i would say if it will cover you go for it phil

 

Thanks, Ambassador Lenny.

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I've been receiving Botox injections for a couple of years. They are most effective after a series of them when they've had time to build up a bit and their effect becomes longer lasting. They are also most effective to regain some movement, aside from just reducing spasticity, when coupled with therapy. The muscles that have become atrophic also need to be stretched back to size. By keeping up with the botox injections to keep it loose and exercising it, you can prevent the muscle from again becoming atrophic and stay ahead of the spasticity.

 

Best of luck with your injections, they do work.

 

Maria pash.gif

 

Only one problem, I can't no more therapy. My insurance ran out in November and I already plateau-d. But I will be stopped. I do stretching exercises on my own, every day. Well, almost every day! I will never stop trying to get better.

-phildogg

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Phil: I am glad you are feeling the effects of the Botox so quickly, this is a good sign and of course, you want to continue. Botox decreases the activity of the strong muscle which allows the weak muscle less resistance to work against.

 

Oral Baclofen does not cross the blood-brain barrier well. Only about 1% of the dose actually reaches the muscles, which is why the doses need to be so high. Bruce just finished the Baclofen Intrathecal trial-directly into the spine, where it bypasses the blood-brain. The difference was amazing. The test dose is delivered directly into the spine, by yet another needle (OH NO-lol). The surgery for the Intrathecal pump is pretty elaborate and scary, so we are thinking about it. We met with the surgeon and know the required pre-op tests he needs and will consider this for 2011. Our founder here, Steve Mallory has a pump and I am sure he would be glad to advise you.

 

However it seems to me you are having good results with the Botox and may want to continue with that for a while and see where you improve.

 

Bruce is WC bound only by choice. At five months post stroke he was walking a full city block, twice a day with a long leg brace, quad cane and supervision only. At nine months post stroke he developed severe spasticity of the affected leg. Apparently this is common, but no one had given us the heads up to look for it. We could no longer lock the long leg brace, so he was fitted with an AFO and with the Botox was doing very well at trying to get back to the distance. We even paid for private PT after insurance ran out because he needed more therapy to get him used to the AFO. In December 2009 he basically gave up. We have been one year investigating the Intrathecal pump and getting into the testing program. It was only luck that the Spinal Cord Injury group at our OutPatient posted a seminar on over-spasticity and Bruce happened to see it. He had heard the word so much between PT, Physiatrist and me that he knew enough to point out the poster to me. In the meantime, swimming greatly helps. He is like jelly after his hour work out in the pool and fortunately really enjoys going. We see Neuro tomorrow and I may ask him to up the Baclofen dose as the drowsiness isn't really an issue, since we no longer do PT or OT and I can work the timing around the pool and his work.

 

In getting Bruce first approved for the Botox, his nurse did a fine job with challenging the refusal to pay (insurance just figured it was for cosmetic purposes) and we were approved that same week. We have a new Insurance carrier, who won't even look at the challenge. I can probably challenge through the state, but if someone isn't even going to try, that is not my first priority these days. Good luck and try to continue: Debbie

 

Ethyl17,

Sounds like a good idea, Bruce getting the pump. You make sure to explore all the in's and out's as to what's best for your man. I know you will make the right decision on his behalf. I'm no longer a candidate for the pump. I'm ruled out for any cosideration for the pump. I asked the doctor about it and she says I'm not there yet, I'm a long way off. At this stage of my recovery, I can walk with my quad cane and I'm pretty independent. That is until I go outside, then I am painfully aware just what my limitations are.

As far as Bruce giving up, I know its the last thing you want to do, but if you have to keep encouraging him. Don't take no or I can't for answer. Put something out of his reach and make go get it if he wants to. I don't mean to give you advice, but it seems to me, if I'd be able to walk that far, I'd be setting my sights on to my next goal. Why did he give up? I can only try to understand and I'm not there. So forgive me if talking out of turn. I can only speak for someone on this side of the "fence". My wife has been tough on me. She makes do stuff I don't necessarily think I am able or want to do. But that drives me to get better. She will only step in when she sees I'm struggling with something or having difficulty. Keep fighting for him and yourself.

-phildogg

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Sorry, Phil~ I was just going by what was written on your profile. My apologies. Good luck.

 

 

No need to apologize, but it's accepted. I used to have long hair and I got that quite often.waycon1.gif

I still luv ya!

-phildogg

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Phil: Thank you for your kind thoughts and input. No, you are not talking out of turn. I welcome all help and suggestions. His college roommate suggested a pet and we have a precious 8 year old cat who has no fear of the WC and just adores Bruce. I never would have thought of that.

 

The issue in my opinion was depression. I learned from this group that most Neuro's automatically order one after stroke. That did not happen here and I finally asked his PCP to order one. It was months, of course, before the dose was adjusted and we saw a difference. Also the pain level increased so dramatically when he went over-spastic. I don't think he ever imagined it could get that much worse.

 

I am a very tough taskmaster, but at some point I decided I was not going to live the rest of my life with my beloved Bruce arguing. Our relationship was in tatters and neither of us could stand to be together. Now there is a lot of history in the post-stroke months that would take hours to explain, but what it came down to was as long as he concentrated on his therapies, I did every thing else and that was where I went wrong.

 

Life these days has settled into a nice routine, he has his chores which he gracefully does without complaint, I am back to work part time and he with a caregiver, and we like each other again. The Baclofen pump is still on the table and we saw the Neuro today who said he felt it was in Bruce's best interest to get it. But I said I will not pay for major surgery, if he will not do the work required afterward. The Neuro agreed and said to Bruce "if you do this, next appointment I do not want to see that WC." So now he has it from the pro. We shall see.

 

If your Botox allowance has run out, please consider swimming. I think you will find it enjoyable and a very nice workout.

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Debbie, you said $2,500 per Botox injections. Our bill is more like between $4,000-$5,000. Of course Medicare pays what they will allow and our Medicare Supplement pays the rest.

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Phil: Thank you for your kind thoughts and input. No, you are not talking out of turn. I welcome all help and suggestions. His college roommate suggested a pet and we have a precious 8 year old cat who has no fear of the WC and just adores Bruce. I never would have thought of that.

 

The issue in my opinion was depression. I learned from this group that most Neuro's automatically order one after stroke. That did not happen here and I finally asked his PCP to order one. It was months, of course, before the dose was adjusted and we saw a difference. Also the pain level increased so dramatically when he went over-spastic. I don't think he ever imagined it could get that much worse.

 

I am a very tough taskmaster, but at some point I decided I was not going to live the rest of my life with my beloved Bruce arguing. Our relationship was in tatters and neither of us could stand to be together. Now there is a lot of history in the post-stroke months that would take hours to explain, but what it came down to was as long as he concentrated on his therapies, I did every thing else and that was where I went wrong.

 

Life these days has settled into a nice routine, he has his chores which he gracefully does without complaint, I am back to work part time and he with a caregiver, and we like each other again. The Baclofen pump is still on the table and we saw the Neuro today who said he felt it was in Bruce's best interest to get it. But I said I will not pay for major surgery, if he will not do the work required afterward. The Neuro agreed and said to Bruce "if you do this, next appointment I do not want to see that WC." So now he has it from the pro. We shall see.

 

If your Botox allowance has run out, please consider swimming. I think you will find it enjoyable and a very nice workout.

 

Ethyl17,

Watch kitty's claws, if Bruce is on blood thinners like I am he'll bleed like hell. I know when I play with my 12-year-old cat, I have to be vigilant or she will scratch me.

I'm fascinated by all this talk about depression. I never (or at least I didn't know about it) had bouts of depression. If you don't feel comfortable talking about Bruce's depression, I'll give my email address phildogg@windstream.net if you'd feel you need to talk on the subject. I'm not prying, but you said it would take hours to explain and all I have is time.

You're a strong caregiver much like my wife. She *beep* me off sometimes but she is helping with my recovery. Sometimes, she can do more but I'm thankful to have her. I could be in a nursing home. She threatens me with putting a nursing home but through it all, she stuck by me! And I've considered swimming but my wife won't take me. Did I tell you I have five kids?

-phildogg

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Phil: Our Kira has no front claws, but she has done a job on both of us with her back ones-lol. Bruce is only on aspirin so I can get the bleeding under control pretty quick. The day he fell and smashed his face open took a while tho.

 

As a Caregiver and Nurse, I was on top of all the medical stuff when Bruce stroked. I kept good notes, had my own medical team to ask advice from, put him in the best Rehab. After he came home, I had my choice of CNAs, paid them extra to work with all the therapists. He worked out with them two hours a day, seven days a week-PT, OT and Speech. As his brain healed, just about six month, it became obvious to me that he was sadder, quieter and losing interest. Since the Neuro had offered an antidepressant, of course Bruce said no, I brought it up with his PCP. Bruce agreed at eight months in to try it. The dose was titered about three months later. Just as the Paxil is kicking in and we can all see a difference, Bruce's thigh went over-spastic. The brace became difficult to lock and then impossible unless someone sat on this leg and someone else locked the brace (you can just imagine the pain) and then hope the thing didn't unlock when we helped him sit and stand. He went into an AFO and we paid privately for more therapy to learn the AFO.

 

Seems every turn of the corner, just when things seemed better, he was hit with another set back. By December he said let the CNAs go, he was refusing to work with them, stop the PT-OT, but he would still swim and go into work a couple of days. The longer he was at work, the more he realized how much he had lost and how much time it would take to get it back. So now only goes in once a week and spends two hours maximum (he was doing two days a week-four hours each day). In October he refused to walk or work out with me at all. He was walking with help to the bathroom, bedroom and kitchen.

 

His Physiatrist changed three times, his Botox was denied and it took a year to get him to the Baclofen Intrathecal trial. I think he has had enough.

 

My mistake was forcing him to concentrate on the therapies and then taking him for a daily trip, like to a State Park or Rec area and leaving him out of the day to day stuff here. I honestly believe if I had been forced to go back to work, I would have had to get him back into routine here, just living in his own home, dealing with the money, dishes, meal prep etc. Even if he messed up, I could still fix it, and he would have felt that he had at least part of the life left that he knew and was comfortable with.

 

Phil, depending on your children's ages, one of them may be able to go into the pool with you, especially if one of them drives. However, I would look up a friend who has offered to help out. There was a quadraplegic at Bruce's pool whose two college roommates took him swimming twice a week and gave his wife the time off. Obviously it took two to manage him, the changing and transfers to the car, but they never missed a day, plus they showered him and washed his hair and shaved him. Then they would have lunch at the pool cafe and take him home for a nap. Seeing them and how thankful the wife was got me through a very tough time knowing Bruce and I had it easy next to that.

 

But you can't go back and you can lament on the what ifs, but that doesn't change what we now have and are dealing with. I have given him a break and we thoroughly enjoyed the holidays without the rat race of getting to work, therapy, pool. All the gain he made may have to be redone, but he smiles, laughs out loud again, makes jokes, asks me about my day, helps out here from the WC, does his chores faithfully and without complaint, and is working very hard to get back to being continent. He knows decision time is coming on the Baclofen pump or he starts walking again here with me or no food (yup, I am as tough as your wife).

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Phil: Our Kira has no front claws, but she has done a job on both of us with her back ones-lol. Bruce is only on aspirin so I can get the bleeding under control pretty quick. The day he fell and smashed his face open took a while tho.

 

As a Caregiver and Nurse, I was on top of all the medical stuff when Bruce stroked. I kept good notes, had my own medical team to ask advice from, put him in the best Rehab. After he came home, I had my choice of CNAs, paid them extra to work with all the therapists. He worked out with them two hours a day, seven days a week-PT, OT and Speech. As his brain healed, just about six month, it became obvious to me that he was sadder, quieter and losing interest. Since the Neuro had offered an antidepressant, of course Bruce said no, I brought it up with his PCP. Bruce agreed at eight months in to try it. The dose was titered about three months later. Just as the Paxil is kicking in and we can all see a difference, Bruce's thigh went over-spastic. The brace became difficult to lock and then impossible unless someone sat on this leg and someone else locked the brace (you can just imagine the pain) and then hope the thing didn't unlock when we helped him sit and stand. He went into an AFO and we paid privately for more therapy to learn the AFO.

 

Seems every turn of the corner, just when things seemed better, he was hit with another set back. By December he said let the CNAs go, he was refusing to work with them, stop the PT-OT, but he would still swim and go into work a couple of days. The longer he was at work, the more he realized how much he had lost and how much time it would take to get it back. So now only goes in once a week and spends two hours maximum (he was doing two days a week-four hours each day). In October he refused to walk or work out with me at all. He was walking with help to the bathroom, bedroom and kitchen.

 

His Physiatrist changed three times, his Botox was denied and it took a year to get him to the Baclofen Intrathecal trial. I think he has had enough.

 

My mistake was forcing him to concentrate on the therapies and then taking him for a daily trip, like to a State Park or Rec area and leaving him out of the day to day stuff here. I honestly believe if I had been forced to go back to work, I would have had to get him back into routine here, just living in his own home, dealing with the money, dishes, meal prep etc. Even if he messed up, I could still fix it, and he would have felt that he had at least part of the life left that he knew and was comfortable with.

 

Phil, depending on your children's ages, one of them may be able to go into the pool with you, especially if one of them drives. However, I would look up a friend who has offered to help out. There was a quadraplegic at Bruce's pool whose two college roommates took him swimming twice a week and gave his wife the time off. Obviously it took two to manage him, the changing and transfers to the car, but they never missed a day, plus they showered him and washed his hair and shaved him. Then they would have lunch at the pool cafe and take him home for a nap. Seeing them and how thankful the wife was got me through a very tough time knowing Bruce and I had it easy next to that.

 

But you can't go back and you can lament on the what ifs, but that doesn't change what we now have and are dealing with. I have given him a break and we thoroughly enjoyed the holidays without the rat race of getting to work, therapy, pool. All the gain he made may have to be redone, but he smiles, laughs out loud again, makes jokes, asks me about my day, helps out here from the WC, does his chores faithfully and without complaint, and is working very hard to get back to being continent. He knows decision time is coming on the Baclofen pump or he starts walking again here with me or no food (yup, I am as tough as your wife).

 

Wow! Thanks for sharing your story. Unfortunately my kids don't drive they're youngins. They all under 10 and the oldest one will have her temporary license in about two months. She better be careful though or it'll be in about three or four months by the time she gets her license. And we live in a rural area about 30 miles from Cleveland, Ohio. I can't depend on no one. And besides, the Y is about 14 miles away. Now I'm not making excuses but I have no one to depend on. Even my wife has limitations on what she's willing to do. For example, she won't drive in the snow. And we happen to live in the snowbelthead_hurts.gif. I had to make other arrangements to have someone else to take me to church on Sunday, just in case. I won't miss another church service.

Way to draw the line in the sand concerning Bruce and his Baclofen pump. You go girl!

-phildogg

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I went to get 12 Botox injections in my right arm (7) and hand (5) yesterday. Hurt like hell, especially my hand. The doctors injected my pectoral muscle too. Anybody have any luck with this type of therapy? I received injections of Botox about four months ago. The doctor told me at the time, I wouldn't be able to come back for at least three months. I was planning on returning until I received a letter from my insurance company questioning the "medical necessity" of the procedure. The doctor went to bat for me and I got a phone call from his office saying I got approved. Thoughts? Comments?

ps. I know this ain't the right forum, but I figured I'm a newbie and I can get away with it.

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My husband gets botox and it really seems to help. It takes about 7 to 10 days for me to see the results and then it wears off after about 3 months. His Nuerologist gives him 400 units in his arm, hand and fingers and then the next time he gets 400 units in his leg. It is expensive but seems to help.

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