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akgoddess51

Stutter

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I have only had my stroke about 3 weeks ago, and did not have a stutter/twitch after the stroke, it started about a week ago, and is worse the more tired I am. My head mainly jerks to the left (the left side of my body was affected), and the stutter gets worse if I am talking about something I am upset or excited about. I haave tried to do some research online, but cant find anything that says anything about stutters/twitching. Has anyone heard of this?

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No, I haven't heard of it here on site as a result of a stroke!! I happen to stutter myself probably since I was a small child as I remember and that has been a few years now!! I think a doctor or speech specialist would be the one to ask about it being associated with a stroke especially with the twitching too!!

 

On the other hand Welcome Aboard the stroke site and I hope you will be able to learn a lot about strokes and being a survivor for a few weeks already!! I will say it does take some time to recover from a stroke I'm just not sure why the twitching or stuttering now!! It certainly sounds like some other causes or problems may be present!!

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I had not heard of it, but found a lot of links to different sites about it. The first link on the search page has weird type and is hard to read. Does your doctor know you have begun stuttering? If not, let him know right away, don't hide info till some future visit. Here's the link:

 

http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=utf-8&fr=slv8-mcaoff&p=stroke%20stutter%3f&type=

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Alaska: welcome. I am Debbie, caregiver to Bruce, stroke March 2009. While Bruce does not suffer this, I would run it by your Neuro.. You are very early in recovery. Your poor brain is still healing - can take up to six months, so things are bound to change down the line. Remember that all those connections (nerves) in the brain that were damaged but still working to some extent, have to find their way to another nerve that is still working, and that takes time. Once the new connection is made, the new area of the brain has to accept the new task. Those areas will do it part time, get quirky about the extra work load, but with exercise and daily reminding, they will eventually take on the new task full time.

 

Music is interpretted in the brain in a different area than speech. That is why a lot of people who stutter, can sing without a problem. Turn your music on and sing. Bruce has aphasia, but I had him sing all day long. Now he does it on his own, with or without music. Can't say whether it helped the aphasia or not, but he sure feels better about himself - not having to struggle to make his needs known.

 

You have recognized that the condition gets worse with stress or being tired. Those are your cues. You must back off. You will only get more frustrated and really, it is your brain telling you it has had enough and needs a rest or a good nap. Sleep is the best way for the brain to heal and you need to take frequent breaks and naps now, during the early stages of recovery. It will also set up a good routine for further down the road.

 

Please do come often and let us know how you are doing, what is going on and let us know what is working for you. All advice is welcome here. Best, Debbie

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I have not seen a neurologist yet other than briefly in the hospital, because I do not have insurance or a job now. I am trying to get some state benefits and have also applied for disability, but I will do some more research on the stutter thing since it started about a week or so after the stroke. I saw my doctor but she never mentioned it during my visit. Thanks for the warm welcome, my friend try to understand but they just can't

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stuttering can be a nuerological condition -- and so was your stroke... and the fact you describe when you are tired it is worse is just like everyone who has had a stroke.. some people who function very well can actuall sound drunk when they get tired..so rest is key... and the stuttering if i had to guess is a slight "tick" side effect from the stroke.. but like all "ticks" will get worse the more you focus on it so then it also in addition to the nuerological aspect of it becomes a psycological issue... most likely there are some meds that might help you be less anxious and that hopefully will help lessen the problem... this is just my "opinion" i am not a med pro.. nancyl

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I had to be re-taught how to talk after ny stroke. Af first, i stuttered.,did n't pre- but did post-stroke.My ST said it was due to not contrulling my air flow.No twtching, though. The stuttering went away on its own after about 3 mos..Speaking slowly helped.Welcme ans good luc, Becky

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I developed a stutter shortly after my stroke, my head would not twitch but I would get tremmors in my left hand. My stroke will be five months tomorrow and my stutter has gotten much better. Like you if I get upset, excited or (for me) can't find my words it gets worse. I try to stop, close my eyes and take a deep breath and then continue slower. IT HELPS A LOT. If I am at home or talking to my family that I talk to daily I am ok now. But if I have to get on the phone, answer questions, or talk to strangers I still stutter. I get really bad when I talk about my stroke or when I am talking to drs. I also replace words with the wrong words now :/

 

I have noticed not just with my stutter but with most things if I stay in my routine comfort zone I do ok, when I start doing my brain exercises or trying to do to much I get pretty bad. Just try to take youor time, close your eyes too, it helped not to have people looking at me wondering what I was trying to get out.

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I had the reverse effect. I was a stutterer and after my stroke my control of it went right out the window. I still stutter and when I'm tired, yes, it does get worse. But if I slow and tap out all my words I can get them out better. Not perfect but OK. In a way I'm glad for the stroke gave me an excuse :)

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Wow, thanks for the good advfice and words. I got approved for something here called Cama, which is acute emergemncy help, so I will be able to see a neurologist which I am looking foward to. I appreciate the kind words and the advice.

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good luck!

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I have similar problem. I have stutter and a great deal of problems talking post stroke. Swallowing is also a problem for me. I am getting intense speech therapy which is helping to find techniques that help me. In my case they called it acquired apraxia. It seems painfully slow but therapy has helped in finding techniques. I would be interested in hearing what has helped people with similar problems.

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Toll: welcome. You have found a wonderful resource for stroke recovery. Go through the topics here. Click on Language Disorders and read through the postings. You will find a wealth of info. Debbie, caregiver to Bruce, stroke March 2009 and a long road back from aphasia.

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I developed a stutter shortly after my stroke, my head would not twitch but I would get tremmors in my left hand. My stroke will be five months tomorrow and my stutter has gotten much better. Like you if I get upset, excited or (for me) can't find my words it gets worse. I try to stop, close my eyes and take a deep breath and then continue slower. IT HELPS A LOT. If I am at home or talking to my family that I talk to daily I am ok now. But if I have to get on the phone, answer questions, or talk to strangers I still stutter. I get really bad when I talk about my stroke or when I am talking to drs. I also replace words with the wrong words now :/

 

I have noticed not just with my stutter but with most things if I stay in my routine comfort zone I do ok, when I start doing my brain exercises or trying to do to much I get pretty bad. Just try to take youor time, close your eyes too, it helped not to have people looking at me wondering what I was trying to get out.

 

I have exactly the same thing. In my comfort zone with one or two close friends I do very well. But with my ex-wife who thinks and talks at warp 9.5, I get really frustrated. Whenever I pause, she drives the conversation off in a different direction and I am lost...Wait, she did that before my stroke too! HaHa.

 

The phone is really challenging for me...especially dealing with customer service folks.

 

Brian

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I had my appointment with the DR. for SS Disability yesterday, and could hardly talk, he kept trying to comlete my sentances and getting them wrong, it was awful :(Then I got so sidetracked I only got out a couple of my issues out (speech and left side weakness) and forgot to finish because he asked about my car accident, ugh. Wish I could stay focused and remember what I am doing.

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The phone is really challenging for me...especially dealing with customer service folks.

 

Brian

how about dealing with an computer trying to talk to an automated system? such fun!

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Oh I hate that, I can't say it, and I can't aenter the numbers right half the time.

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Guest hostwill

Going to the neurologist is the best advice. Since no two strokes are alike, A neurologist will best prescribe what is best. be advised,brain healing takes a long time for plasticity (re-wiring) to take place.

-Will

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