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THE BRAIN'S WAY OF HEALING by NORMAN DOIDGE, M.D. This is a book about Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity published in 2015. This is Not a How To book. It is about alternatives to traditional medical practices in rewiring the brain. It does not give resources but it is an interesting read that makes one feel hopeful and optimistic again. Through case studies It discusses how movement and exercise affect the damaged brain, light laser therapy, music therapy etc. some of these are used experimentally and some in other countries. Not a light read....427 pages.

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Wow!  I'm impressed by your reading fortitude :-)   This topic sounds interesting.  I don't think I would want to read the whole book, but it would be interesting to skim over some time - I might check and see if the local library here has a copy (I'm often surprised at what they carry!).  Thanks for sharing! 

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Pearls you are awesome that you read such a big thick book. This does sound interesting though like cons2g said. I would have huge difficulty in reading this but it is defininately something I would be interested in learning about.

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this sounds like a very good book.  my reading patience for longgggggggg books is not good, but I checked and it is an audio book.  I have listened to "the gene" as an audio book and in fact did it twice!  you don't get bogged down.  I am going to try it.

 

thank you

 

david

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Pearl that sounds like another read I should tackle.   Right now reading an ebook called Brain Facts: A Primer on the Brain and Nervous System.  I like actual books after trying this.  It did help me with the page turning. Bookmarking was excellent but recalling what I read that something just have to do.  Over and over sometimes.  Makes for slow reading.  Interesting learning as some of the material you can relate to.  Its more a medical book so I find it not too compelling to read. 

Next read a hard cover book "Cross The Line"  James Patterson. 

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I am now reading "whole food recipes" it's a magazine but still reading lol. Smiles...I haven't read a book since the big S because I haven't been able to get through the pages. I may have to try again it's been a while.

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On 10/6/2016 at 7:58 PM, Pearls said:

THE BRAIN'S WAY OF HEALING by NORMAN DOIDGE, M.D. This is a book about Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity published in 2015. This is Not a How To book. It is about alternatives to traditional medical practices in rewiring the brain. It does not give resources but it is an interesting read that makes one feel hopeful and optimistic again. Through case studies It discusses how movement and exercise affect the damaged brain, light laser therapy, music therapy etc. some of these are used experimentally and some in other countries. Not a light read....427 pages.

I recently watched a documentary on the Life and Work of Dr. Marion Diamond.  In 1964, her groundbreaking research on brain plasticity was published.  Modern Neuroscience on brain plasticity is based on this paper.  Her approach was straight forward.  In one group, mice were given learning exercise with reward while the control group did not participate in the learning exercise. In a post-mortem of the mice brain, she found that "learned" mice had bigger brains than the "non learned" brains.  Prior to this paper, Neuroscientist believed that the brain was genetically imposed.  I remember my Neuro-PT explaining that the brain is plastic and I had to relearn balance.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/146/3644/610

Thank you for sharing. I am particularly interested the Music and the Brain.  Music is incredibly beautiful and almost a drug to me now.

 

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Wow Pearl, I am  so inpressed that you read a book like this. I would love to  say I can do this as well, But......... after the stroke, I would not , could not, focus to even read a leaflet.  Slowly and nice and easy, I started reading my Grand kids books.  Just enough pages , even if I had to read the chapters twice.  I now pick up my bible, still have to read the sentences twice, but I am now  trying, before I just give up before trying.   I do have the bible on CD's, so enjoy  listening to it. Helps me go too sleep.  Just wanted to share that.

Yvonne

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On 10/6/2016 at 10:58 PM, Pearls said:

THE BRAIN'S WAY OF HEALING by NORMAN DOIDGE, M.D. This is a book about Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity published in 2015. This is Not a How To book. It is about alternatives to traditional medical practices in rewiring the brain. It does not give resources but it is an interesting read that makes one feel hopeful and optimistic again. Through case studies It discusses how movement and exercise affect the damaged brain, light laser therapy, music therapy etc. some of these are used experimentally and some in other countries. Not a light read....427 pages.

 

Hi Pearls,  I read this book last year too.  It was a great book.  I learned so much from it.  But it took me a long time to read.  Actually reading is part of my therapy since I can only focus a short time before I lose it.  I can usually only get about 15-20 minutes in before my headache gets really bad and I find myselft just skimming the page without reading.  Then I know it s time to stop.  I would highly recommend it no matter how slow you can read it.  It made so much sense to me.  I reallized that the stroke didn't destroy my muscles, just broke the connection to my brain and there is a good possibility that you can make a new connection over time.  OVER TIME - no miracles

 

As I've said in other posts MUSIC is very likely to help.  I have used music to help me improve my walking and other exercises.  I also used the light laser therapy in from the book and in 2 or 3 days my balance improved so much my wife could really notice.  (It's not perfect, but I take any gain to regain some oldtime normalcy) I could walk across the room with no rolator.  That was a first.  I only needed to touch - notice the word touch - to keep my balance.  My brain could take that input and correct my tipping as I moved.  This may not help others, and I was a bit sceptical, but for me it was as valuable as months of therapy on this. 

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Stockflyer - Was rereading your post and it struck me when you mentioned the need to touch. I do the same thing. When walking I am 90% better if I can touch something next to me.....a wall, a person, a car, a bush..... anything. I do not need to lean on it for support, just touch it. I would rather walk without a cane so that I have a free hand to touch things near me. It helps restore my balance. If I have to go down steps with no handrail, I will ask total strangers to stand beside me just so I can touch their shoulder or arm.

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On 10/6/2016 at 10:58 PM, Pearls said:

THE BRAIN'S WAY OF HEALING by NORMAN DOIDGE, M.D. This is a book about Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity published in 2015. This is Not a How To book. It is about alternatives to traditional medical practices in rewiring the brain. It does not give resources but it is an interesting read that makes one feel hopeful and optimistic again. Through case studies It discusses how movement and exercise affect the damaged brain, light laser therapy, music therapy etc. some of these are used experimentally and some in other countries. Not a light read....427 pages.

thanks , i downloaded this from google/play books today, now i have two great books on recovery to inspire me.

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To Peals, a OT told me to try that.  Glad to hear I am not alone on that.  My current PT is not as aware, but she is working on my headache part and the things she is doing seems to be working better than expected.

 

Back to topic: what am I reading.  -- I signed up to goodreads.com and found they had a thing where you could put a personal challenge on book reading for the year.  Although the normal person on the site set 45 or 50 books as goal, my goal was 4 books.

 

I have read the 4 book goal and I am probably finish 5 by end of year.  I am currently reading James Rollins - Excavation novel.  This is a decent read, may not be the best book ever but it has a good story and is holding my attention to keep reading.  Tried other books and give up on them if they don't interest me.

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No point reading something if you aren't enjoying it! Congratulations on reaching your goal.  So much of reading depends on both the book and your mood.  If you start a book the rule I was given as a kid was read the first 3 chapters if you aren't enjoying it by then put it down and try again some other time.  It's worked for me for 40ish years.

 

I've just started on "The Ghost in my Brain" as recommended by I forget who on here. It's a description of cognitive failure and recovery after TBI (the case in the book is concussion not stroke) using visual spatial reprogramming and neuroplasticiity  It's fascinating and actually a relatively easy read so far.

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Hi, I'm not trying to push goodreads, but they help me and don't know it.  They send out periodic requests to update your progress on the book you are reading.  Like you are on page 10, then page 35, etc.  So the prompts keeps me trying to move it forward.  Like a therapist who pushes but not too much.

 

I did the one chapter a week thought.  was reading one book.  Chapter one was 10 pages.  So I said ok, 1 every few days.  Chapter 2, 140 pages.  :cry:

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The complete stories of Philip K. Dick Vol. 3. Philip K. Dick is probably my all time favorite fiction author (Hunter S Thompson being my non fiction fave) . He wrote tons of novels from the fifties thru the late 70s that were made into movies (Blade Runner, Minority Report being a few) This is a book of short stories which really help my retention and concentration. If you enjoy sci-fi with a paranoid, psychedelic twist, give him a read. He wrote literally hundreds of novel so theres a lot to choose from.

 

 

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Merichen, a old member and all around groovy chick, started a book club of sorts. It was a discussion on the subject. I have a hard time reading. I love to read but with my eyes bouncing, comprehension of what it said, It makes me so tired to try to read for so many behind the scenes things are  happening ( ie trying to follow the sentence, remembering what I read) 

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I have the same problem as Kelli, my eyes bounce up and down a sentence or two and it takes a lot of effort to reconstruct it into something coherent. I've found magazines work for my attention span and the narrower column width makes it easier for me.

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Mike - don't know Phillip Dick, so did a little review of his writings.  I now understand -- You are one demented guy.  lol.  Actually never read his stuff or watched any movies but did add him to my reading list and will try some of his thinking.  Maybe he will just straighten me out.

 

thanks for something new

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If you like science fiction you should like him. For a first time reader you might try "Do androids Dream of Electric Sheep" or "Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said". They're not that long and they're pretty representative of his work. There's literally hundreds to choose from though.

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Good to hear some of his stuff is still around. He used to be a classic read like Asimov. My first Sci-fi reads were the Carter of Mars series. They blew my mind and directed me into a lifetime of following an exciting medium. A book I read once every two years is "Timeline" written by the author of the Dinosaur Island. My own book "Pooti" is published electronically.

Deigh

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Where can we find your book online Deigh? I'm always looking for a new book to read. I've tried variations of kindle pooti but its not coming up for me

 

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I used to really enjoy reading Robert Heinlein. His earlier works were pretty classic sci-fi but in later years he went in a more social commentary type of sci-fi. But, his stories always had a strange humor to them. I always enjoyed the character Lazarus Long, the immortal man. The novel Time Enough For Love made a good case that living too long carries a high cost.

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You could try 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HJ3A94W

 

It's one of the greatest science fiction books ever written but so far has been undiscovered by publishers and movie makers!

AAhhhh!

Deigh

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