Linnie

Canada: Legalization of Marijuana for Recreational Use

29 posts in this topic

OK, I've searched and searched for the other marijuana topics; couldn't find so I'm putting this here (which may not be the right place for it!)

 

Marketplace (consumers' advocacy organization in Canada) is addressing the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana (which is supposed to happen in the spring) on this week's Friday night TV show (November 25).  If you want to see it, tomorrow or any day try:  http://www.cbc.ca/marketplace/episodes/2016-2017/superweed.  

 

I can copy and paste the summary of the show which I'll receive next Friday, for those that are interested.   :smoke: (No, that's not me....it's you) LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just had medical marijuana legalized in FL but are months if not years away from being able to use it. The state has to now finalize the laws, determine how many dispensaries there will be in the state and how to license them. They need to make an ID card for the patients and their caretakers, the doctors need to attend a special class and be registered. The specific list of conditions which it is specifically allowed for is short and stroke is not one nor is pain but that may fall under the 'or other conditions'. The absolute earliest I've heard for it being available in any form is next July but smart money is on 2018. It will still still be schedule 1 federally thus illegal at the federal level with no safe harbor available if the feds happen to arrest you for it. I don't foresee any of my doctors pursuing being able to prescribe this. Just getting anything for pain in FL is a fruitless endeavor unless you enjoy being stigmatized. Throwing that into the mix is not for me, too much risk and hassle..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scott, sorry for the confusion.  Wow, you guys have it tough!!  Medical marijuana has been approved in all of Canada for quite some time.  The legalization that's being addressed now is in reference to recreational use.  Many people have been after the Federal Government for years to take this action, because they feel it's no different than having a beer.  Besides, the Government will earn a very large tax from the sale of the rec drug, rather than all the money going into drug dealers' pockets.  

 

I'm sure there would still be drug dealers for opiates, etc.; but if a person only uses marijuana, I think they'd feel safer going to a legal dispenser instead of the dealer.

 

I should have put Legalization of Recreational Use of Marijuana as the title of the topic   :oops:  Don't know if I can change the title now.  If anyone can, please do.  :Help: 

 

 

Edit: Ok, I couldn't change the name of the topic, but I put "legalization for recreational use" in the first post.  Hope it helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi again,

 

Re medical marijuana:  Many veterans in Canada are provided with 10 grams of pot each day.  Recently announced that it's going to be cut back to 3 grams per day effective May 2017 because of the extreme cost.  Veterans with "exceptional circumstances" will be able to get more than the 3 grams.  Interesting article re this: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/veterans-hehr-pot-policy-1.3861534.

 

Re recreational use:  Recorded last night's program on DVR.  Watched it, and after rewinding and rewinding (won't tell you how often!), I was able to make a note of some of the highlights.

 

- In the 70's, pot had about 4% THC and 4% CBD.  (CBD counteracts the unwelcome effects of THC)

 

- The various strains of pot available on the streets today DO NOT contain any CBD; and the amount of THC averages around 20%, some strains up to 30%.

 

- Studies on the effects of using pot were somewhat different in adults and teenagers.  Both experience brain activity similar to schizophrenia (well, they said it!) and adults return to "normal" when drug wears off; whereas a major problem for teens.

 

- A lot of worry about the number of teenagers using the drug, including cannabis-induced psychosis.  

 

I really question the concern about teenagers getting the drug when it becomes legalized for recreational use.....they're getting it now, just the same as they're getting alcohol!

 

As I said previously, I can copy and paste Marketplace's summary of the show when I receive it next Friday.

 

Personally, after seeing the program, I definitely will not try the drug when it's legalized....my brain's messed up enough already! LOL   :wink_anim: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lin, What legal restrictions will the legalization of pot have? Like alcohol is a legal drug, as long as you're at least 21, and you're not driving? 

 

 

Scott, I thought that one of the arguments for legalizing pot, even in its' artificial form, was that the THC in it treated pain. Am I wrong? If I'm right, someone will challenge that law on the grounds that it is discriminating.

 

                                                                               Becky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so glad it is being recognized for their medicinal pros. It's not for everyone, like  you said but great post  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Becky, here is the list of required diagnosis

 

Patients in Florida diagnosed with one of the following "debilitating medical conditions", are afforded legal protection under the Florida Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative, as per Amendment 2:

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)

  • Cancer

  • Crohn's disease

  • epilepsy

  • glaucoma

  • HIV/AIDS

  • multiple sclerosis

  • Parkinson’s disease

  • post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 

  • or any other ailment/condition of the same severity/symptoms, when determined by a physician's opinion that the medical use of marijuana would surpass any potential health risks

That last one is a bit fuzzy and I would expect any doctor using that to be subject to the same scrutiny that the schedule II prescribers are subjected to.

 

Interesting article out today

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article117065203.html

 

Here is the list of doctors in increasing distance from my home. As you can see by their prices they will have a very lucrative captive audience. The whole cash thing reminds me of how FL got such a bad rap as a pill mill capital to the point that where trying to get treatment for pain is extremely difficult .
https://www.marijuanadoctors.com/doctor/search?distance=state&location=33634&qf=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Becky, yes, I think it's safe to assume there will be limitations similar to those placed on the sale/use of alcohol or cigarettes.  The legal age for these items in Canada is decided by the provinces and territories....it's 18 years old in Alberta, Manitoba and Quebec; and 19 years old in all the other provinces, as well as the Yukon and Northwest Territories and Nunavut.  

 

Police across Canada have been testing three saliva-based roadside devices on suspected drug-impaired drivers (apparently it's been intensely studied in different countries how to detect the presence of drugs, including marijuana).

 

Quote: "The Mounties said surveys and research suggest drug-impaired driving is becoming as prevalent as driving under the influence of alcohol.  Officers using the device at the roadside would ask drivers to stick out their tongues as a sample of saliva is taken with an instrument similar to a tongue depressor......Currently, police who suspect drug-impaired driving use a standard sobriety test that includes looking at a driver’s eyes and asking the person to walk and turn and stand on one leg.  Suspected drivers can also be examined by a specially trained police officer called a drug recognition expert and be given a blood test."

 

I couldn't find any reference to anyone being charged yet for drug-impaired driving in Canada, so just contacted my sister who is with the RCMP.  Charges have been laid by both the Mounties and City Police forces, but she couldn't tell me if the drugs used were marijuana, cocaine, opiates, etc. (because of confidentiality),  and the method of detection was drug-recognition experts.  The saliva-based technique is still being tested.

 

Legalization for recreational use is not going to change anything I think.....Marketplace had said there are 100's of thousands using pot now on a regular basis.

 

:oops:  A significant change:  I hear it often that Canadians are somewhat afraid they'll get so used to carrying pot on them once it's legalized, they'll forget to leave it at home when crossing the border to the States!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scott, Dr. Mark Ware (who is a world-renowned doctor, practices pain management at Montreal General Hospital and at McGill Research Institute) is the vice-chair of the federal task force which will or will not place any limitations/restrictions on such things as the level of THC in the pot sold.  On Marketplace, he came across as very blasé, sort of.....what's the big deal, it's not a new drug, it's already used by many people, and we can look into THC, CBD, etc., after it's legalized for recreational use.  Struck me as strange!!  But the task force's report hasn't been tabled yet, so nothing's finalized.

 

However, FYI, Dr. Ware's drug of choice for treatment of chronic pain is marijuana (I think 12.5% THC).  I noticed in an article about him that he has found the use of cannabis very positive on central neuropathic pain (CNP) for people with multiple sclerosis.  I admit I don't know very much about the CPS that some stroke survivors, such as you, experience.  Am I right in thinking that CNP and CPS are the same??  If so, I hope that all the States will legalize medical marijuana, and include CPS on their list of "debilitating medical conditions".  Good luck and Godspeed!   :) 

 

P.S. I just checked out your link re the article in the Miami Herald.  I noticed the comment "federal laws that continue to hold that marijuana is an illicit drug without medicinal value"!   Wow....has Trump voiced his opinion on this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The president elect has not but his AG candidate has...it has no medical value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth the saliva roadside drug testing has been used here in Australia for several years now, the early test did have significant false positive results, but so far as I know they haven't been successfully challenged recently.  There's muttering about legalising medicinal marijuana, but no idea if or when it may happen, although the families of severely epileptic children are pushing for it because other drugs don't seem to work for them.  I don't see recreational marijuana being legalised any time soon here.  For something with "no medical value" it provides help to a large number of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a hard time believing other countries don't want to legalize pot for medical and recreational use.

 

The reasons it makes sense to legalize for medical use is apparent.

 

Some of the various reasons for allowing recreational use:  

1) Fed Gov't can really use the taxes for other necessary expenses;  

2) The police and courts will no longer be tied up dealing with people who are charged with possession (like maybe 2 grams); which will give them more time to go after individuals/groups who are trafficking drugs;

3) Hopefully, the police will also have the time to watch at school yards (from elementary to high school!) to see if traffickers are in the vicinity to sell to these kids.

 

Man, this has got me thinking about prohibition, rum-runners, and bootleggers!

 

As I've said, I don't want to use the drug, but am 100% behind the legalization for rec use!   :Jammin: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lin, I agree with you although the current strains with the very high THC levels scare me.  But we currently have a super conservative government in power and we can't even get gay marriage passed here. I think recreational pot has got buckleys chance, but I'm hopeful on the medicinal  getting through eventually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it lit up the papers here again, the county I live in put a 6 month ban in place. The local governments are coming unhinged over this issue.

http://wfla.com/2016/11/29/tampa-bay-area-governments-attempt-to-ban-medical-marijuana/

 

A lot of people tend to forget about employee drug testing, smoke weed for any reason and you don't get the job. Personally I don't care as an employer (which I am) but my lawyers have absolute fits about potential liability so I'm not committing either way. But if I were to use it medically I'd be a hypocrite for banning others. That federal law makes it a real Hobson's choice

http://wfla.com/2016/11/10/floridians-said-yes-to-marijuana-but-employers-may-still-say-no/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Living in the "Bible Belt" in the US we will likely not see any legalization of pot for medicinal or otherwise for a long while. I find it very expected here. It's a shame that some people use a prop to use against possibly helping others and not really even try to understand any medicinal uses. This is not everywhere so I'm not exactly making a broad statement but for my state I think it fits. As far as recreational use...don't even get me started you know I grew up in the area where moonshine running was a big thing and to compare the two is laughable. Again this is just my opinion. Get drunk run over someone or stay home get high and eat nachos. You decide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I live in FL, and like Scott said, people voted Yes, but  I think that the money side is holding it up.A good friend  died from brain cancer in England, he told me that " pot" was the only thing that gave him  relief.   A cousin, had caner in the bones. She was on doctor meds and was in so much pain, till she died.

 

If I was in pain, i know what path  I am going to walk.  So easy for people to say no, yet people are drinking, getting in a car and killing people.  I rest  my case.

 

Yvonne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it lit up the papers here again, the county I live in put a 6 month ban in place. The local governments are coming unhinged over this issue.

http://wfla.com/2016/11/29/tampa-bay-area-governments-attempt-to-ban-medical-marijuana/

 

A lot of people tend to forget about employee drug testing, smoke weed for any reason and you don't get the job. Personally I don't care as an employer (which I am) but my lawyers have absolute fits about potential liability so I'm not committing either way. But if I were to use it medically I'd be a hypocrite for banning others. That federal law makes it a real Hobson's choice

http://wfla.com/2016/11/10/floridians-said-yes-to-marijuana-but-employers-may-still-say-no/

 

Scott, I looked at your links:

#1 Government not listening to voters sounds like a bad move!

# 2 You really are between a rock and a hard place!

 

BTW, in a previous post, I asked you if the neuropathic pain that people with multiple sclerosis have is similar/the same as CPS.  I'm curious because multiple sclerosis is on the list you gave of conditions that can receive medical marijuana.  Through my volunteer work, I know a lot of individuals who have MS....some use muscle relaxants, others use pot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tracy and Yvonne:  Your comments about it being safer to smoke pot and get the munchies, rather than drinking and driving is another reason why Canadians are looking forward to the legalization for recreational use in the spring!

 

Heather: Canada must be more advanced than I thought!   :Ponder:  I forget how long ago same-sex marriages were permitted by law here; I just remember that some Americans came to Canada to marry at that time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lin,

 

My understanding is that post stroke CPS and MSpain are similar in that they are flavors of CPS, but I can't say that authoritatively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Scott, I hope I didn't put you on the spot with my question....I know I have to curb my curiosity!  :( 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No summary in today's Marketplace newsletter; maybe next week??  If you want to see the program, CBC uploaded it to YouTube: 

 

What's in today's weed? Testing the chemicals in marijuana ... - YouTube  

 

The YouTube version is about 22 minutes long, and after watching, you'll see lower on the screen some interesting comments!   :)   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tracy and Yvonne:  Your comments about it being safer to smoke pot and get the munchies, rather than drinking and driving is another reason why Canadians are looking forward to the legalization for recreational use in the spring!

 

Watch out for this one. We are told that pot impairs driving in a similar way to alcohol, reduced reaction speeds etc. that's one reason why the drug testing was added to our drink driving testing, it's not about "the war on drugs" here.  I guess that fact it's illegal means that people are a little less likely to be needing to drive home after, that would not be a factor if recreational use is legalised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely agree with you Heather I think pot can and does impair driving just that in my experience from many years ago I don't remember people wanting to get out and drive but they definitely want to munch. I know of so many more who have done this but it was a choice of alcohol and I know this definitely is something that can lead to death for you or someone else. Totally not saying that the same couldn't be true the other way around just in my experience it usually was not a factor. I'm not saying this because it really affects me, I don't smoke pot or eat or anything nor do I drink alcohol. Just an opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Heather & Tracy,

 

You ladies are really in debate mode, LOL.  (I like debates too!)

 

To sum it up, as I've said in previous posts legalization is simply that; buy the pot from licensed dealers rather than buying it from shady drug dealers.  Hundreds of thousands of Canadians have been smoking pot (or eating laced brownies, whatever) without it being legal; and I expect it would be similar in your countries.  Once it's legalized here, the same people will continue to use it.  I do find that the people I know who use pot tend to like mellowing out  at home with their feet up.  Teenagers and young adults, probably a different matter....but that's where parental control is needed.

 

As far as the driving impairment, yep, that goes on now with the use of legally purchased alcohol and illegally purchased pot.  Both will continue after the marijuana is legalized, and the police checks for alcohol or drug-impaired drivers will also continue.  Keep in mind, the number of alcohol or drug-impaired drivers has dropped significantly because of sober drivers now using their cel phones to contact the police if they suspect that another driver appears to be impaired, driving erratically.  Drivers have that to worry about now before they get behind the wheel if they're impaired.  I feel fairly safe in surmising that this is probably also happening in your countries.  (Hope those sober drivers remember to pull over before using their cel, because that's the larger problem currently regarding car accidents!)

 

Hope this clears it up.....won't know if the quantity of THC in the pot legally sold will be limited until the federal task force's report is completed.  The only thing we can be sure of at this time is that people buying pot will have to pay tax on it..... :peace: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Lin and Heather I'm all friendly talk no worries.  :) I am not a yay or nay person but I do think legalization and regulation (which has to include policies and laws about underage use and DUI or DWH lol ) would be a better way to handle marijuana in my opinion. Yes because that way it takes it out of the control of the shady drug dealers and imposes regulations and restrictions. I realize there will always be the shady dealer out there and that people will do what they are not supposed to do but I feel that given its' effects it would or should be more categorized like alcohol. If not then at the very least study the value of medicinal use for sure. My Aunt who stood by my uncle's side while he wasted away and died of brain cancer is as goody goody as they come and I know she had no question in her mind if it had given him some relief. I'm really not debating with anyone. This is reallly all my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now