GreenQueen

Just diagnosed

8 posts in this topic

I went to the doctor today to get the results from my blood test, ultrasound and X-ray.

My knees and pelvis are fine. Very pleased about that. I am certainly still struggling with sore knees, but there is no damage and no arthritis.

Unfortunately, I have diabetes.

I looked at my doc for like a solid minute, until he said

"Looking at me like that won't change it,"

He knew I was in total disbelief. Except for the obvious, and having my gall bladder out when Carrah was a baby, I've always been healthy. No nothing.

I'm still in shock.

HOW do people cope...??

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Janelle I hate to hear you got negative news at the Doctor. My step dad has Diabetes and I know he has to be on medication for a long while. He also has really used his diet to help with the help of my mom (she cooks and buys the groceries). I don't have any personal experience myself but I am sure many on here do. You let me know if you need info and i will do my best to find some. Hugs.

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Thanks Tracy, you've just brought happy tears to my eyes.

You have so much going on yourself and yet you offer to help...hugs to you my beautiful friend.

I am hoping once it sinks in, I'll start looking for information. At the moment I just can't even think about looking...

I see a dietitian once every two months, and she's actually coming Wednesday. I've emailed her, hoping that she'll bring literature with her...

I am still in shock...

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Hi Janelle, it's a big shock but sometimes weird stuff happens, my family reacted the same way when my nephew was diagnosed as Type I diabetic at age 17. It was always a risk for him as his Mum had gestational diabetes when growing him.  At least there is enough diabetic history in my family that we all knew what was involved.

Hopefully you are Type II and you can reverse it with diet and exercise. (although the exercise side is always more tricky for us strokees)  I assume you also have a referral to an endocrinologist.

Just remember that it can be easily managed these days and is nuisance value not end of the world.

Hugs

-Heather

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Janelle, I had the exact same reaction as you when my doc told me a few years ago that I was diabetic. When I got  over the shock, I got angry; No one on either side of my family was diabetic, so why was I? Diabetes  tends to run in families. So, I threw myself into research. I found out that taking statins can cause diabetes. Some cholesterol drugs are statins. I had been taking the same statin for 7 yrs post-stroke! As luck would have it, we moved to a different state a few months later. I ran out all of my meds, including my statin. It was 6 mos. before we  located a new doc, and I actually got in to see her. So, I was "medless" for about 6 mos. And, guess what? I wasn't diabetic any more. But, my bad cholesterol was having a field day, and I was put on a milder statin because I raised  my concerns. That was 4 yrs. ago, and I'm not diabetic yet, but I won't be surprised if I test positive for diabetes eventually.

I'm not suggesting that you stop taking it  if you're on a statin, but you may want to do your own research, and talk to your doc.

While researching, I also found out that you really can manage diabetes with exercise and diet. There are skads of recipes for diabetes on- line.  I'm glad you already have a nutritionist, as that will help a lot. I  expected to find a lot of dietary restrictions, and was pleasantly surprised to find that the only major restriction was sugar, which I really missed, sugar addict that I am! Most of the diets for diabetics that I read about were low, or no sugar; low carb, low fat; just wholesome food, with emphasis on fruits and veggies and not meat. 

You can do this, Janelle. It's pretty straight-forward, and some of it you may already be doing. Good luck, Becky 

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If you are testing yourself or taking insulin then there is a nearly painless guage needles and lancets that are micro thin. Today we can avoid thickened finger pads and needle phobia. Also ask your doc for an rx for diabetic shoes. There is catalogs many styles and support care for feet free of charge is great.

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Thank you so much for your advice and tips and tricks.

Heather I'm not sure what an endocrinologist is? I'll need to look that up.

I'm type 2, caught early apparently.

He's not going to get me to test myself, because of my useless hand.

My dietitian comes tomorrow. Hopefully she'll make me feel less...shell-shocked by the whole thing!

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