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GreenQueen

Just diagnosed

25 posts in this topic

I went to the doctor today to get the results from my blood test, ultrasound and X-ray.

My knees and pelvis are fine. Very pleased about that. I am certainly still struggling with sore knees, but there is no damage and no arthritis.

Unfortunately, I have diabetes.

I looked at my doc for like a solid minute, until he said

"Looking at me like that won't change it,"

He knew I was in total disbelief. Except for the obvious, and having my gall bladder out when Carrah was a baby, I've always been healthy. No nothing.

I'm still in shock.

HOW do people cope...??

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Janelle I hate to hear you got negative news at the Doctor. My step dad has Diabetes and I know he has to be on medication for a long while. He also has really used his diet to help with the help of my mom (she cooks and buys the groceries). I don't have any personal experience myself but I am sure many on here do. You let me know if you need info and i will do my best to find some. Hugs.

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Thanks Tracy, you've just brought happy tears to my eyes.

You have so much going on yourself and yet you offer to help...hugs to you my beautiful friend.

I am hoping once it sinks in, I'll start looking for information. At the moment I just can't even think about looking...

I see a dietitian once every two months, and she's actually coming Wednesday. I've emailed her, hoping that she'll bring literature with her...

I am still in shock...

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Hi Janelle, it's a big shock but sometimes weird stuff happens, my family reacted the same way when my nephew was diagnosed as Type I diabetic at age 17. It was always a risk for him as his Mum had gestational diabetes when growing him.  At least there is enough diabetic history in my family that we all knew what was involved.

Hopefully you are Type II and you can reverse it with diet and exercise. (although the exercise side is always more tricky for us strokees)  I assume you also have a referral to an endocrinologist.

Just remember that it can be easily managed these days and is nuisance value not end of the world.

Hugs

-Heather

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Janelle, I had the exact same reaction as you when my doc told me a few years ago that I was diabetic. When I got  over the shock, I got angry; No one on either side of my family was diabetic, so why was I? Diabetes  tends to run in families. So, I threw myself into research. I found out that taking statins can cause diabetes. Some cholesterol drugs are statins. I had been taking the same statin for 7 yrs post-stroke! As luck would have it, we moved to a different state a few months later. I ran out all of my meds, including my statin. It was 6 mos. before we  located a new doc, and I actually got in to see her. So, I was "medless" for about 6 mos. And, guess what? I wasn't diabetic any more. But, my bad cholesterol was having a field day, and I was put on a milder statin because I raised  my concerns. That was 4 yrs. ago, and I'm not diabetic yet, but I won't be surprised if I test positive for diabetes eventually.

I'm not suggesting that you stop taking it  if you're on a statin, but you may want to do your own research, and talk to your doc.

While researching, I also found out that you really can manage diabetes with exercise and diet. There are skads of recipes for diabetes on- line.  I'm glad you already have a nutritionist, as that will help a lot. I  expected to find a lot of dietary restrictions, and was pleasantly surprised to find that the only major restriction was sugar, which I really missed, sugar addict that I am! Most of the diets for diabetics that I read about were low, or no sugar; low carb, low fat; just wholesome food, with emphasis on fruits and veggies and not meat. 

You can do this, Janelle. It's pretty straight-forward, and some of it you may already be doing. Good luck, Becky 

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If you are testing yourself or taking insulin then there is a nearly painless guage needles and lancets that are micro thin. Today we can avoid thickened finger pads and needle phobia. Also ask your doc for an rx for diabetic shoes. There is catalogs many styles and support care for feet free of charge is great.

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Thank you so much for your advice and tips and tricks.

Heather I'm not sure what an endocrinologist is? I'll need to look that up.

I'm type 2, caught early apparently.

He's not going to get me to test myself, because of my useless hand.

My dietitian comes tomorrow. Hopefully she'll make me feel less...shell-shocked by the whole thing!

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Hello Janelle, It is a shock. When i was told by doctors who i had told that I was not feeling well. My eyes were giving me trouble, i was  getting up using the bedroom most of the night, drinking lots of water, and was eating food like I was staving. It was my Mother in England, told me to ask them to test me for sugar. Thanks goodness for Mothers.

 So while the doctor was talking, I  kept saying "I do not like sweets ". Of course this had nothing to do with it, my father has it, and I am the lucky one out of five kids.   Things have improved , since I had this for seven years.  Things like taking blood pressure pills break down to sugar, and gusse who has High blood pressure. They have now know that Metforming is not as great as they used to say.  I have at last got a doctor that listens, also studyed, and  told me straight that I have to take owner ship.  At last, I am losing weight, by eating right, vegs, oats, beans, nuts. I also move a lot. Walking, keep fit, Yoga, and even Tai Chi. I also go to the health shop, wish i had done this at the get go. I drink Apple cider Vringar, which cleans me out. Also take cinnamon which has cut my eating. I am on insulin, after the stroke, my sugar went out of control.   Now , I am aiming to get off this, and the medcine. Please listen to your doctor, ask questions. If you can excerise do it. Please ask me questions. God Bless

 

Yvonne

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Thank you Yvonne.

I do have a question, you may be able to help me.

 

Ever since my episode, I have leg spasms at night time. 

 

For just over a week, I've been watching what I eat.

 

Two days ago, I had a meltdown day and had a bar of chocolate and a chocolate milk drink. That night, my leg spasms were out of control. Do you think this may be linked to sugar? I'm not seeing my doctor for another few weeks, but it's definitely on my list to ask.

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Prob best talk to your doc about these. They can be many things. Do they swell when these come?? Does elevating help?Does activity that day bring them on or does activity prevent or help?

 

LOL Choc helps My pain give me MORE!

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Hi Janelle,

Sorry to hear about you T2D.  I remember when the doctor told me I was diabetic.  I don't cry and pretty much broke down and was in complete shock.  I didn't have any of the indications that you normally think of.  But it doesn't matter, now you have it.

 

If you want to reach out on any questions or what I do, etc, I'm willing to share.  Just shoot me a note and I will get back soon. 

 

Just read everything you can about it.  Try to understand just how different foods impact your BS levels.  Your doctor may tell you to only test 1x a day.  Do it more in the beginning so you can see how you flow through the day.  I use the one-touch delica lancet since it has the thinnist needle and many times I don't even feel it. 

We all react differently to different things.  Some stuff that will mess me up all day, you may not even notice.

 

John

 

In spite of all  ---  Have a Great Day!

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Janelle how have things been since you found out your diagnosis. I'm sure it is a tremendous amount to digest and very stressful. You know I will always listen. 

 

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/recently-diagnosed/?referrer=https://www.google.com/

 

https://diatribe.org/issues/63/learning-curve

 

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/Supplement_2/S139

 

https://www.uptodate.com/contents/diabetes-mellitus-type-2-treatment-beyond-the-basics

 

https://patient.info/doctor/the-patient-with-newly-diagnosed-diabetes

 

I don't know if any of these will give help but thought I would find a few that are recommended for newly diagnosed diabetic patients. Maybe you will find some good tips. Hugs my friend.

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I use thinnest tiniest 33 guage. It helps plus lancets in colors. I have pretty test kits. I have one connected to my computer that tracks my numbers.

 

Just eat in moderation and I journal so I remember how I feel.

 

It becomes a lifestyle habit. I test out to dinner and take insulin before salad. so what. be strong. be proud.

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Hello, it is hard, tough news to hear, but if I can do it, anyone can. I am a 'stiff neck person", plus I love food,  not so much sugar, but most foods have sugar, plus high blood pressure pills, break down to sugar, and I  was on a lot of blood pressure pills.  So I am not getting anyway with my sugar my A C was 14. Then my Husband find this doctor, who is a family doctor , but also trained in Diabetes.  Best thing I did. First I was listen to, then told it was time to take 'Ownership", and if I did not put any work into it, then I was always going to be on pills, and insulin.  She than told me that med-forming  was medicine that they now know does nothing to help you. I could have told them that, has I said  it shows with my numbers that the pills were not helping me.  So I took "ownership", and went into the health store. I got some cinnamon pills, which I take one after I eat. I also got some Apple Cider Vinegar, which cuts your appetite. I also started eating on a child's plate, also eating better. At last I love green veges, I make Oats, I eat lots of beans. I have stop eating so much bread, that I could had shares.  I drink a lot of water. Plus I  walk every day, also go to Yoga, and keep fit. My goal is to get off insulin, that is hard, my tummy looks  like a pin cushion.  After three weeks my AC is now 6. I keep been told that I look so good. For me, I have made a "lifestyle" change, and have taken" ownership". Of course we are all different, but with eating right, and getting some exercise, you can make  a dent in your health for the good. Plus stress brings up our sugar. My spirituality life is so much better. I use to be Miss worrier. now i pray listen to "Z" radio, which plays great christian music, I belong to a bible strong church, that does a lot in the community, so I help others, and take the spotlight of me.  

 

Yvonne

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Thank you everyone for the kind thoughts and advice.

To say I really appreciate it is an understatement!

A few days after my diagnosis my nana died. I comfort eat unfortunately.  Just got back under control when a "friend " really upset me with negative comments about me. Wow. More comfort eating. 

Now my kids are on school holidays. 

Not comfort eating as such...more like holiday mode!

 

Now this diagnosis.  I found out I'm only 7.1. As far as I know that's only "just" diabetic? 

The doctor put me on quite strong medication according to my chemist. So...not taking that.

I'm going to eat well but I truly ate so badly before,  changing things for better choices will make a huge difference. 

Like milo. Ever had milo my dear North American friends?

Well the ratio factor of milo to ice cream is disproportionate towards the milo.

You should say I have ice cream with my milo!

Well now I have sugar free ice cream with fruit.

Not gonna lie,  I miss my milo. But I'm willing to give a healthier lifestyle a try.

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Janelle, I must have overlooked this topic!  So sorry about the loss of your nana, and tell your "friend" to "Bleep, bleep, bleep"!

 

Why you have unexpected diabetes?  My 2 cents: you were probably a great deal more physically active pre-stroke.  My dad was always active, always on the go, but he lost his vision when he was in his early 70's, and became much less active.  When he was 80, he was diagnosed as having diabetes type 2.  His doctor told him to attend a number of diabetes management sessions (I forget how many, but maybe 3 or 4) to learn how to make some lifestyle changes, foods he ate, etc.).  He did what they told him, and he passed away almost 3 years ago at the age of 90....He never had to take insulin, and told us it wasn't difficult to make the lifestyle changes.

 

Fair dinkum (ha), tell your doctor about this and ask about management sessions that you can attend with other newly diagnosed people.  With young children, it may not be as easy for you, but     Fingers Are Crossed Smiley Face, Emoticon

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Janelle I just read your post too. I am so very sorry about your nana (hugs). I agree with Lin tell your friend to bleep, bleep, bleep! Ok now you will have to explain what milo is. LOL I know it can't be a movie character which is the only thing I can think of. :tongue: 

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Milo is a brand of chocolate Malt flavoured drink, it's sold as a "powder" that you are supposed to mix into milk, to make chocolate milk, but it doesn't fully dissolve unless heated so the crunchy froth on the top is the best bit, when you mix it into cold milk.  And if you are feeling wicked you just put the Milo onto your icecream like topping.  It very sweet and certainly not recommended for diabetics.  Janelle, as a kid my Mum had a thing about Milo so we only got it at other people houses,  at home we had Akta-vite, it's not the same but you might want to try it.  One of my favourite nostalgic desserts is vanilla ice cream with sliced banana and Akta-vite. Although as a banana-phobe, these days I skip the banana unless Mum is watching.

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Ahhhhh I absolutely had no idea LOL. Sounds a bit like Ovaltine here in the states but Milo sounds a bit yummier. Thanks for the description Heather. :smile:

Wow I searched Australia Milo and see that it is popular in many different countries! It does say it somewhat similar to Ovaltine. I can't believe I've never heard of it! Learn something new everyday.

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Milo is the bomb!

unfortuantely Heather is right.

Big no no for diabetics!

 

When we were young Tracy and you were eating a peanut butter and jelly , I thought it was really jelly!! (I think you call jelly Jell-o?)

 

We call jelly Jam...we all speak the same language apparently!!

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HaHaHa Jelly in America is basically jellied fruit juice but some people intermix jelly and jam. Jam here would mean it usually has seeds or bits of fruit in it where as grape jelly for example is seed and fruit free juice that has been jarred. Well just the pieces of fruit not in it and still the juice but it is probably just a lot of sugar lol. Like Milo.

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I love that we are so different and have our own way of saying things! :smile:We are a bunch of interesting people!

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First , I am sorry  about Nan,  Losing someone so close is hard, but you have your memories.  I know Milo, coming from  England,  as  children we love to drink it at Winter, before we go to bed.   Like i have said before, if I had only knew what I know now. I went to classes, but the Nurse we had was a tough hard nose lady. She scared us,  there was six in the class, and we asked no questions.  I just wanted to get out of there, and go eat. I did not change my "lifestyle", got on pills and insulin.  Now I know that you have to change the way you eat, veg, brown bread, brown rice, leave sugar alone. Water is good to drink, soda is bad, so is chips, and too much butter is not good. Cinnamon helps  with your blood sugar numbers. Oat meal is very good, so is eating a egg in the morning.   Moving, is great for the body and heart. Eat fruit like apples, melons, blueberries.  Sweet potatoes are great to eat, there is so many receipts on the internet , that are so easy to make. Fish is so good for you.  Like I  mention,  what I know now, hinder sight is a wonderful thing. The center  I go too, I tell the other members, listen to my story, take ownership, and you have to change the way You Eat, and move it.  I look forward to my walking, morning and evenings. You do what you can, just Move it. :bouncing-for-joy:

 

Yvonne

 

 

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HI Janelle

 

I have had type 1 diabetes since I was 2.  It's harder, the more you grow, the tougher it is to hear that (diagnosis).

 

I am sorry to hear, it will come as second nature to you.  I am here to support you.

 

A

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