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Deigh

Improvments

9 posts in this topic

Steve,  I read recently in one of your replies that you had two years of talk therapy. Were you taught any 'tricks' of talking or was it just repetitive reading? I seem to be showing improvement in most of the problems left to me by the stroke except talking. I read aloud every day and deliberately plan my walks so I bump into people to chat with. When I remember I real aloud everything I write (I had to add the remember bit, I quite often forget to do it!).

However, the results of all my hard work are disappointing to me although everyone else (Kindly) says I am doing well.

What tips can you give me?

Deigh

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Let me butt in here, too.   My hubby, had a massive amount of speech therapy out, and I did a lot with him on my own.   He still has aphasia, but is so much better - his stroke was very bad, so he has lots of leftovers.   The one thing to realize is that the stuck part of speech happens in the speaking of it.   When you read, read out loud, so your brain has a chance to practice saying the words and getting them out.    I listen to Bob when he reads, because he may not know he is making mistakes if I don't catch them.    I don't know if you have the same kind of problem, but he had about 3 or 4 things that hindered his reading.   One was that, his brain was anxious to finish the sentences and would put in any word that seemed a logical next word in the sentence and he's miss the real word/s coming up!    But the out loud repetition is the most important part of any speech therapy, as the words have to have practice being actually said.

 

As far as the kinds of things he did at speech therapy, there was a lot of trying to build areas of the brain that held similar information. because the brain strores things by category.  This is really important, and gives your brain more power by being able to organize types of things in its storage of information.   For instance, sometimes he would write out a list of every kind of dog he could think of, or every kind of car, or farm animals, then read this list out loud.   Lists that are more detailed, like parts of a car, lists of grooming items,  Keep the lists, and read them out loud often.    Sometimes, don't look at the list and make it again and see if you remember all or maybe different ones.   

 

 

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Sandy,   thanks for that reply. My problem seems to be that I have a lot of facial muscles that are not working properly, My tongue for a start is not as strong as it was and this is obvious by the way it has trouble cleaning my teeth after a meal. Next are the muscles around my mouth which restrict the mouth opening, this has required me to drink out of a smaller sized mug than I used to do, in order to avoid dribbling. 

Then there are the other muscles which give me great difficulty expressing the letter 'R'. The word RURAL causes great mirth in the family and is only slightly worse than JUROR. Other words are PRESCRIPTION  and RESCUE, plus a few others that occasionally crop up. 'S' can also be a handicap and I say 'SCHWEETHEART' like James Cagney.

I read aloud to my wife who does not take prisoners, she insists I slow down and enunciate properly rather than my habit of trying to get the sentence out fully. When out walking I try to remember to whistle and occasionally try to warble as I once could. 

When I say 'I try to remember', it is because when on an exercise walk there are many minor problems that have to be faced like my inability to walk fast and so I do not attempt to cross a road unless it is completely clear of threatening traffic. This is possible only because I live in small town New Zealand. Anywhere else you would be stuck on the wrong side all day! Other things are my lack of ability to twist my head around rapidly, anything requiring my attention to one side requires me to stop. Also anything like facing broken paving or steps require my full attention.

Whilst pointing out these problems I hasten to add that they have gradually diminished over the last two years, when I first started walking on my own the world was like a minefield!

Finding the words is not a problem for me, getting them out is. In a social gathering I have to collect my ideas together and then when an opportunity to talk comes my way, get the words out regardless, ignoring everyone else's desire to speak. This sometimes means that the subject matter has moved on. I ignore this problem!

Deigh

 

 

 

 

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It is so refreshing to see members or 'family' helping members ' family':happy:

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Reading your post, I just remembered a few exercises that one of my STs gave me to do to exercise those muscles around my mouth. They won't take long to do, and you can feel your muscles stretching as you do them. First, grin as wide as you can. Hold for a few seconds, then form your lips into an "o", just like you're saying the letter "o". Hold for a couple of seconds, then make an exaggerated pucker with your lips. Repeat all 3, doing each one 10 x. Becky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You've got some great advice here, Deigh.  This, as well as your wife's suggestion, will keep you improving!  :smile:

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So far everyone has come up with suggesting that I just continue exercises. I will do this but I was asking for tricks, let me explain.......Early in my stroke recovery I kept biting my cheeks on the inside, very painful, I can assure you.

Trick one...

To overcome this problem I would take a mouthful of food and then swing away from the table (our seats swivel) and bend from the waist, with my head parallel to the ground I would do the chewing and then return to the orthodox table position to digest and refill.

This meant that my cheeks were weighing themselves away from the teeth and allowed me to munch without biting. A table napkin on the floor took care of mishaps. This was an uncomfortable and unsightly way of eating but it worked and allowed the cheeks to heal.

 

Trick two......

My fingers would not hold a guitar plectrum for more than five seconds.

I designed a plectrum glued to a strip of fine leather with a hole in it. This hole went over my thumb and helped lock the plectrum in place. I am still using this device today to enable me to play the guitar.(pix of it are in the pictures gallery).

 

I was asking if anyone had tricks I could use to improve my speech. I am pleased that no-one suggested standing on my head while talking or trying it with a mouthful of marbles, (an old anti-stuttering device).

 

Deigh

 

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Are you saying the only speech difficulty you have is that you can't get the words out because of face muscles not co-operating?   

 

Look thru these links:

https://www.google.com/search?q=stroke+face+exercises&oq=stroke+face+exercises&aqs=chrome..69i57.4056j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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Here is another thing we did.    These simple sentences are used repeatedly in interacting with others, and there are quite a few categories.   My repeatedly reading them outloud, you can improve your response time.   Of course, replace details like where you live with your own info - don't want to practice someone elses details.   I think this is a good practice, because when I studied Spanish, I would always practice out loud.   People don't realize that we are not used to speaking another language, and it's difficult to get your mouth in order to get out the foreign sounds.    I have friends that only studied silently, that could not speak upon an opportunity, and messed their sounds/words terribly, because they had no practice at it.   Where I could spit the words out quickly, from having lots of practice at saying sentences... that didn't help my bad grammar though, ha, ha!

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