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SassyBetsy

Aromatherapy

16 posts in this topic

I stood smelling tiny vials in an aisle in a store. My son waited shaking his skeptic head. His eyes watered at the last one I sugggested. I like the grapefruit, orange, tangerine and the winning one was peppermint. My PT suggested it was good for nausea from dizzines. I also just loved clean minty energy that calmed my nerves.  Am I for real? I feel smell is ndeesmated.

 

I need a soothing balm for pain that overtakes all my soul.

Has anyone felt this.

Has it helped a central nervous system?

 

 

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I love the smell from a lemon balm plant. You rub the leaves between your fingers and get an instant lemonade smell. Very calming to me. Peppermint smell makes me feel energetic. I believe in aromatherapy .

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Smell is something I work hard to suppress in myself. The shower and any running water smells like a chlorine gas chamber and I can even smell the very minute amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas from the zincs in the hot water tank, a new post stroke attribute. I grew up on a fruit and vegetable farm and the smell of cherries in bloom was wonderful. I still remember fondly the sights and smells of walking through a 20+ acre cherry or apple orchard in full bloom.

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yes Scott I am super sensitive to smell now. I carry a small spray bottle that erases stinky bio scents. It works in public bathooms. 

yes scents atach to memories.

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Pam, A while back, a friend suggested that Lavender has a calming affect for nerves (anxiety) and muscles. Every producer of aromatherapy oils that I've run across claims the same. Becky

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I buy lotion, fabreez, soap, Detergent, candles, air spray...stuff with lavendar. I kinda wanted to use something energizing to help my brain fog. I believe lavendar is a must have.

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I am a fan of smelly goods. My nose is super sensitive so I need to stick with certain smells, which I do, and I find that they help me so I don't smell death everywhere lol

smell.jpg

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sheesh what a shock keli!LOL!

I hope you do not smell death everywhere.

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Have you seen oil diffusers?YOU PUT SOME OF THE OIL (WHATEVER SCENT YOU WANT) in the diffuser, and a fine mist comes out, smelling like your chosen scent. They're supposed to scent a large area (depends on the brand as to how much area). I'm still looking into it, but I think I'm gonna try it.   Becky

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yes. I have them. I love them. They can be costly at first but well worth it.

 

Pam, my mother was cooking a roast beef and I had to leave for I was getting sick. Smelled like garbage to me  

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On 7/25/2017 at 1:55 PM, scottm said:

Smell is something I work hard to suppress in myself. The shower and any running water smells like a chlorine gas chamber and I can even smell the very minute amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas from the zincs in the hot water tank, a new post stroke attribute. I grew up on a fruit and vegetable farm and the smell of cherries in bloom was wonderful. I still remember fondly the sights and smells of walking through a 20+ acre cherry or apple orchard in full bloom.

 

I'm always learning something new here....several of you said super sensitive to smells.  Is this stroke related?  I had no allergies before stroke, but first one to hit was allergy to fragrance.  The smell of flowers or perfume/cologne felt like it was choking me.  (Now my list of allergies is so long, it's easier to say allergic to everything, lol.)  I always have with me a list of medications I'm allergic to.

I remember too the smells I used to love....fresh cut grass, flowers (esp. lilacs), but have to avoid these smells now.  Can only use scent-free products for hygiene, laundry, cleaning, etc.; otherwise that choking feeling and hives...Yuck!

I'd love to use aromatherapy, but Big Orange No Smiley Face, Emoticon

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I've always been very sensitive to smells.  I always loved to work in my herb garden as the good smells would linger in my clothes and on my hands.  I used to go to the theatre or a concert and spend most of the performance with my head in a hanky trying to filter out the perfumes from the people around me.  The worst part was always walking down the laundry aisle in the supermarket, between the stray soap powder and the smells it was hell. As I got older I've become much more tolerant to it.  but I still avoid fabric conditioners, smelly laundry detergent and scented loo paper, wherever possible.

 

After my stroke a friend made up a massage oil for me that had rosemary, peppermint and thyme essential oils in it. She used to massage my bad arm/hand with it each time she visited the hospital. I've no idea if it helped functionally, but it was certainly good for my mood.

Sweet smells are not my thing but I do like the "spicy" and "woody" smells.  give me peppermint, sandalwood, rosewood, eucalyptus or tea-tree and I'll be happy, forget jasmine, patchouli, etc. Although I'm not against rose oil in small doses, and Mum used to wear a bluebell perfume that I rather liked.
 

I do think Aromatherapy is not completely quackery. There are studies that show that memories are often linked to smells.

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Lin,

I use all scent free laundry products because it feel like I'm in a cocoon of smells. Sometimes a dryer sheet get left behind in the dryer and that means rewashing if I didn't notice it there. We don't even want to talk about the annual algae bloom and how it makes the water smell. :sick:

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Eww Scott, wonder how much I could make if I started bottling our PEI water and selling it??  No one here buys bottled water....unnecessary.    Re: Dryer Sheets - I use Bounce Free & Gentle.  It says Dermatologist Tested, Free of Dyes and Perfumes.  Works for me, and Tide laundry soap also dye and perfume free.

 

Hey Heather, welcome back!

On 7/28/2017 at 4:23 AM, heathber said:

I still avoid fabric conditioners, smelly laundry detergent and scented loo paper, wherever possible.

 

Can you get the dye and perfume free laundry products there?  

 

Scented loo paper?  I have a long ago memory (actually when I was just a kid) of loo paper in lots of different colors, so you could choose the color you liked, very important, eh?  I don't remember if they were scented....They were taken off the market (again when I was just a kid) because of the dye (and possibly scent??)  :humming:

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I remember colored TP and yes scented! Shame that. I liked the pink rolls.

 

Keli When pregnant I cooked thanksgiving. The smell of turkey cooking sent me vomiting outside. I had to leave. The house smelled like that for days.  Interesting bcuz not bother me now.

 

Hormones and smells????

 

I

 lovee

 

orange and tangerine.

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Haven't seen coloured loo paper for years now that you mention it, although I do still see the ones with printed patterns occasionally. They have stopped scenting the paper but they do still put scent in/on the cardboard inners, I hate going to other peoples toilets because of this. hypoallergenic or sensitive skin versions of most products are available here(i.e. without scents or dyes), once again you pay more to make them leave stuff out!  I use a eucalyptus infused laundry powder, that has no fillers in it (often it's the fillers that cause my reaction to laundry powder, pure soap doesn't make me sneeze in the same way, and leaves much less residue in the clothes).

 

 

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