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Hello!! I have a question for my fellow stroke survivors. Were your emotions all over the place after your stroke? I'm almost to the 3 month mark after my stroke and I've been back to work a month so things should be good for me, right? Well they are going pretty good but I am so emotional it's not even funny. I've always been a crier but not like this. I cry at the drop of a hat. I don't just cry about stroke related things either. I cry over everything. And if I'm not crying I'm angry or sad or whatever. I'm just so emotional and not necessarily in a good way. You've all told me more than once to not push myself and I wonder if maybe that's what I've done and am doing. Idk but I don't like it!! I just want to be myself, the pre-stroke me. I know that's not an option though. I'm not the same person that I was. Just an FYI: my stroke was in my cerebellum, in the part of the brain that affects my vision. It also could've affected balance, coordination and speech so I'm very blessed in that respect. Just wish I knew what was wrong with me and how to fix it. Thanks for listening and thanks in advance for any advice you may give---Glenda 

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Glenda, it's called Emotional Lability, very common in strokes. I have never been a crier and Hubs never saw me cry in the 3 years of our marriage. Now I cry at the drop of a hat, and get explosive anger -- so unlike me. I find it embarrassing when it happens. I, too, started in my 3rd month.

 

I found this link to be helpful .....

 

http://www.strokenetwork.org/newsletter/articles/lability.htm

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Thank you so much!!! I was seriously wondering if I was losing my mind. I'm sorry you've had to go through this but your comment has made me feel so much better. Thank you. 

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You are very welcome!  I knew nothing about it until other members told me. I'm so glad it helped you! 

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The medical term for this problem is called Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) but most stroke survivors refer to it as emotional lability.  It's extremely common among stroke survivors.  Fortunately, it's manageable and almost completely disappears with time. 

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Thank you!! I really thought I was losing my mind!! I was never like this before. My husband said he had noticed it also, after I asked him. He knew better than to bring it up on his own. Lol! Thank you all for letting me know I'm not crazy and this is a real thing!!

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Wanted you to know that PBA has different forms, so don't worry if you do as I did: First of all, pre-stroke, I wasn't a crier. But, post-stroke was a different story. "At the drop of a hat" like you said. That lasted a few months. Then I started this new thing . If I started laughing, I couldn't stop.If with other people, I'd laugh long after they stopped. A couple of times, I needed to breathe, but I couldn't stop laughing long enough to inhale. And,yes, that was scary, and gave a whole new meaning to the expression, "died laughing". Fortunately, this phase lasted only for a month or 2.  Also wanted you to know that there are meds to treat it if it becomes too troublesome for you. Ask your doc.   Becky 

 

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Thank you Becky and Lenni. I thank God for the day I found this site. I had no idea that what I'm going through is a real post-stroke thing. I just thought I'd post about it and see if possibly anyone else had had a similar experience. I'm so thankful for you all!!

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Hi Glenda, yes super hugs from me too. It's such a weird thing when it happens to you. you can be super happy and crying uncontrollably, or super sad and laughing your head off. You don't know all the little adjustments you brain is doing constantly behind the scenes to have what you body displays match your emotions/feelings and to temper them for public consumption until that system breaks.

 

I started on the drugs for this about 6 months post stroke as I did not want to have to explain this thing to everyone I met in the office.  Like a lot of your post stroke issues you can relearn the skill but it takes time and you probably won't get back to the level of control you had pre stroke.

 

The big challenge for me with the drug solution was accepting that I'll be on a drug that is usually prescribed as an anti-depressant for most of the rest of my life. It helped once the psych explained that I was not clinically depressed, even though I was crying uncontrollably, and depression is common after stroke too.

-Heather

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Glenda,  for the first few days after my stroke the crying was almost unbearable for me. I could burst into tears when being visited by people I didn't even particularly like! After that it eased but was (and still is) not far below the surface and I have to avoid anything sensitive. I also found increased sensitivity to bright lights, loud noise and anything irritating. My short temper got even more short and again even now has to be carefully controlled after two and a half years. I am also intolerant to temperature changes. 

This is not to say that things have not improved, they certainly have, but not enough to say that my emotions are completely under control! 

I have had to learn to live with these problems on top of the physical shortcomings.

Deigh

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Glenda,  Wow. Good for you for able to go back to work so soon. Don't be super hard on yourself if you feel "emotional"  you will soon find your happy medium . :)

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On ‎9‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 9:26 PM, becky1 said:

Wanted you to know that PBA has different forms, so don't worry if you do as I did: First of all, pre-stroke, I wasn't a crier. But, post-stroke was a different story. "At the drop of a hat" like you said. That lasted a few months. Then I started this new thing . If I started laughing, I couldn't stop.If with other people, I'd laugh long after they stopped. A couple of times, I needed to breathe, but I couldn't stop laughing long enough to inhale. And,yes, that was scary, and gave a whole new meaning to the expression, "died laughing". Fortunately, this phase lasted only for a month or 2.  Also wanted you to know that there are meds to treat it if it becomes too troublesome for you. Ask your doc.   Becky 

 

I laugh when I should be serious. I cry when I'm happy. Like you I was never a crier. And OMG I can understand that feeling of laughing so hard and not breathing... It hurts my side and head 

 

BTW what work do you do? ( If you said I'm sorry forgot, oops :) ) 

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Thank you all so much for the comments!! I was very fortunate to be able to go back to work so soon. Maybe too soon actually =/  Idk but I feel like I'm doing ok. I have an amazing work family that does everything within their power to help me and let me work at my own pace. I still have some issues that I'm trying to work through. It's like I'm trying to live my life like I did before my stroke but I know i can't. I'm not the same person that I was. I just want things to be "normal" again. If I get the least little bit lightheaded, I'm scared to death that I'm having another stroke. That's how my stroke happened-lightheaded/dizzy then no peripheral vision. Will this be "the big one?" Now this emotional thing is going on. But I'm so thankful for you all and letting me know that it is a real thing and that I'm not crazy. Thank you all for sharing your stories with me and letting me vent about my issues 😊

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ksmith I just saw your question. I'm sorry!! I'm a nurse at a doctors office, so having  the issues with my eyesight stopped me in my tracks! I've been a nurse for 24 years and worked at the office for 11 years. My fellow nurses have pitched in even the doctor I work for and front desk. I really have an amazing job and am so thankful for it 😊

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Reply to new member GLENDA-  Hilltop Shadow     Boy, was I relieved to read your blog and  discover my own Emotionall Liabilty was similar to others.  Yes, i knew about the crying and I had manic laughing until recently when it, thankfully, wore off to a much lesser degree.  What I wasn't prepared  for, was the frustrated anger,   I bang my walking cane on the floor (Nanny McPhee?) and blow my top!   it can be for something trivial and afterwards, I feel dreadful and guilty.   My hubby rightly says I've got to get this anger under control but it ignites so suddenly!  I should be a sweet old lady at my age, not a harridan!  

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That's my main problem -- frustrated anger -- and it can seem to come out of nowhere!

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I believe in it, too, Linnie!!

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I FOUNF MYSELF LOOKING AROUND AT MY WHEELCHAIR AND NON FUNCTIONAL ARM AND LOSING IT. ALWAYS WHEN FRIENDS WHERE VISITING ME. IT WAS AWFUl, I COULDN'T STOP IT, OR BREATHE WELL  AT ALL. I HATED IT SO THE DOC PUT ME ON LOW DOSE LEXA PRO, WHICH WORKED BUT SORTA FLATTENED ME OUT EMOTIONALLY.

I DONT LIKE THAT EITHER SO HE SAYS I CAN GET OFF IT SOON. SINCE IT STOPS THE BLUBBERING, I AM NOT SURE IF I WILL, OR MIGHT TRY IT TO SEE HOW IT GOES. 

JUST ANOTHER MOUNTAIN TO CLIMB IN THIS PROCESS.

i also laugh like a nut case at things that are only mildly funny.                           

my wife calls it my evil laugh.

 I love watching comedy stand up on you tube, and laughing for awhile is healthy.

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I would welcome some of that laughter right about now!! I'm so over the crying all the time for no reason and anger outbursts out of nowhere!!! 

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I never thought about doing this when I suffered from those terrible tearful times but I wish now I had explained to people that they were emotional outbursts and not crying. There is a big difference, to cry is to shed tears because you are upset, and is completely unacceptable in the male psyche!. These were just emotional overloads and a result of one's oversensitivity to light, sound, surprise, temperature and even pleasure.

Deigh

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Wow I am so glad that I am not alone in this. I just joined and I have been having soo much anxiety lately. It feels like I am going  crazy sometimes

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Welcome mac!!! This site and the people are amazing! I hate that any of us have to go through these things but it's so nice to know there's a place to go and talk to people that understand. To know that no we're not crazy. This emotional lability is a real thing. It helped me so much to know that I'm not losing my mind and what I'm going through has a name. Hope otherwise you're doing well. How long ago was your stroke if you don't mind me asking?

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