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For those who are walking without assistance, when did you weak leg stop feeling heavy? I am doing well with the cane and better weekly unassisted, but the left leg is still heavy and saps my stamina. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Alan,
My stroke was 17 years ago.  I don'y use the cane indoors,only ouside.  leg pretty much has that heavy feeling all the time.  Wishing you the best.

~Beth

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3+ years and my right leg still feels heavy. If I push it too far it can become downright painful. But As time has progressed I've increased my stamina slowly.

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Just finished my third year after stroke, my leg still feels heavy and unwieldy, especially when I wake and get out of bed first thing. To me, the leg is the least of my worries, as long as I can walk unaided for two K, that is all I need to complete my exercise routine.

I am far more interested in getting my right hand to work better and also improving my communication skills. Yesterday we had a family gathering on a beach with a barbecue. I  found it very uncomfortable not being able to join in fluidly with the conversation. I pushed the envelope and occasionally managed to hold my own, but it was hard work and I ended up quite exhausted.

Deigh

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Everything is exhausting, I read that doctors now think it is brain based fatigue and rest will not help, I tend to believe that. I can do a lot but it sucks the strength out if me.

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2 hours ago, alansd said:

Everything is exhausting, I read that doctors now think it is brain based fatigue and rest will not help, I tend to believe that. I can do a lot but it sucks the strength out if me.

 

I must be feeling very negative today.  After 20+ years everything can still be exhausting for me.  I know regular exercise would help, but I have zero motivation. 

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I walk with/without cane. Mostly without and that heavy feelings hasn't gone away. I can't run/jog for my legs feel like they weight 1/2 ton each. 

38 minutes ago, smarshall said:

 

everything can still be exhausting for me.  I know regular exercise would help, but I have zero motivation. 

 yes totally agree. Nap after a shower still, almost 9 years. I tell people thinking is rough for me. Sounds like I'm kidding with them but I am not. I try to read a book, after one page, I'm done.

I have no motivation. People always tell me I would feel better if I exercise but I feel fine. Not depressed. Mentally exhausted. People don't seem to understand that.

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It does take more brain power to get that affected limb to do things and the connections do tend to be less efficient so brain fatigue happens. Also the muscles themselves are not working efficiently so you expend more energy than you did before.

 

I would not say my leg feels heavy, but it is very stubborn. The theory is that the more you use the new pathways the stronger they get. My walking patterns are slowly becoming more automatic and efficient but I still get the fatigue accumulation and the more tired I get the less efficient the walking is. I just had 2 weeks holiday the first week I was walking every day on uneven terrain (bush walking/trekking paths in the mountains) I was sticking to easy trails and only doing very short walks 2 - 4kms. I was getting a full 10 hours sleep a night but the week after I did almost nothing, and I still slept 8 hours per night plus an afternoon nap.

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11 hours ago, ksmith said:

 yes totally agree. Nap after a shower still, almost 9 years. I tell people thinking is rough for me. Sounds like I'm kidding with them but I am not. I try to read a book, after one page, I'm done.

I have no motivation. People always tell me I would feel better if I exercise but I feel fine. Not depressed. Mentally exhausted. People don't seem to understand that.

 

Thanks, Kelli, I'm feeling much better.  (It's still very early in my day, but I'll take what I can get!)

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I spend a little bit t of couch time being retired, its winter, and I can't drive. I do go to PT regularly also. I find if I get up every 30 minutes or so and do a variety of movements, it helps. I do squats holding onto a kitchen counter, lunges holding onto my cane. Stair steps ,up and down on our staircase a few times, then crunches layingon the carpet, the hardest part is getting back up. I do resistance one hand against the other and with bands to get my bicep and tricep working too.i also make my self get up and walk without the cane just to do it. Much of this is hard of course but it makes me stronger. The heavy left keg slows me down but if you are not going forward, you are going backwards, I try hard not to nap though I often want to. 

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Alan you are still very early on in this journey, if your brain wants to sleep and and you have the time you are better off listening to it. Unless it stops you sleeping at night. Much of the consolidation of new information happens while you sleep so trying to push through fatigue is generally counter productive in stroke recovery.

Otherwise your routine sounds excellent. While on the carpet try adding "bridges" ( hip extensions) and hamstring curls, which will also help with walking strength, and should reduce "heavy leg".  Also as well as squats do your "sit to stands" from a hard surface ( e.g. kitchen chair). Sit to stands are great for core strength and balance

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Well two days ago I woke and felt different, my legs hit the floor and were lighter noticeably. Yesterday I did 4 minutes on the treadmill, and today fir the third day I am walking easier. My stroke support friend says his recovery was like that, all if a sudden he could walk much better. If this us a turn of the corner I am so grateful and excited to see what is coming.

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Alan,

That is often how it works for me. As time goes on the brain learns new pathways around the damaged area. The process is much slower now 3 years later but sometimes I wake up and find something has changed even if only a little bit but it adds up.

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I am glad to feel the change, my legs seem to turning a corner in the process, next for the arm hopefully.

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