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Had some excellent night views of the space station recently with clear skies. Everything went wrong with the blue moon observation though, we had a storm earlier and I only got occasional glimpses of it through the clouds .

I find that it is very pleasurably being able to look above me without falling over. For the first year or so after my stroke this was impossible and my evening searches for satellites was rather frustrated. 

Deigh

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I know what you mean. I still tend to start blundering around if I try to look up to far. The tightness of my neck muscles helps to keep me from doing that. I always enjoyed looking into the sky at night. More than once the wife and I took the boat out and anchored in the middle of Tampa Bay to just watch the sky. These days not a lot of people can say they have seen the milky way except in pictures.

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I've always wanted to see the Northern Lights (I've seen them faintly, but they just looked like light clouds in the sky).  I find it's a good idea to hang onto something before I tip my head back to look up.  Sometimes, I even get dizzy just looking straight ahead of myself when I'm walking, so I have to look at the ground.  My PT's don't like that! :-)   Anyway, until I find a way to get WAY away from the city (Minneapolis), I'll just have to keep looking at beautiful pictures online and using my imagination.

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I used to hear about not looking at the floor when walking in rehab. I'd point out that lifting my head was still quite painful because of the muscles in my neck being in a state of contraction which wasn't being addressed. We finally got that resolved, then one day I had to point out that I would be much more likely to succeed if they raised the cone obstacle course to eye level if they didn't want me looking at the floor.

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5 hours ago, scottm said:

 if they raised the cone obstacle course to eye level if they didn't want me looking at the floor.

 

Bit of a catch22 situation there !:hmmmm:

Deigh

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It's part of the propriaception stuff that goes missing after a stroke. As my PT says your feet are where you left them you don't have to look at them to know where they are. They want you to glance at the course and judge the distances without actually looking at your feet all the time. Walking while looking down makes you more vulnerable in public as well as being less mechanically efficient, probably because looking at your feet while keeping your core engaged is super tricky.  It has gotten easier with practice but I'm not sure I'd be game to move far while looking up into the sky.

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No, if you look up at the sky when walking you are going to put your foot into it.

Deigh:oops:

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