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tyrusrex

Hemorrhagic stroke and Aspirin

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Hey, I had a hemorrhagic stroke last year.  And a few months ago, I switched health plans and got a new primary who happens to be a nurse practitioner.  She added to my prescription a daily dose of aspirin.   Just a few days ago, I read that aspirin could be bad especially if one suffered from a hemorrhagic stroke.  I asked my primary about this and she said to keep taking the aspirin and ask when I next see my cardiologist.  Is this a good idea?  My primary said that it's only a low dose aspirin, but I really don't see a need especially since my stroke was due to extreme hypertension and I don't have a risk of clotting due to excessive cholesterol.    Should I continue taking a low dose aspirin or should I stop taking aspirin completely?  My next appointment with my cardiologist is in early March.

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 Hi great question. I would continue taking it for your doctor put you want it but I would also contact them and inquire that you recently read something that it could be bad for people who’ve had an isometric stroke. One of the hardest things that we do , I know I do, is to go online and Read possible side effects or health risks for common ailments  that I may have. I’m not saying a stroke is a common ailment but always contact your doctor before you do or change anything. 

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I, too, had a hemorrhagic stroke, and asked my primary the exact same question. My concern was that aspirin is a blood thinner, and I wondered if I had another would aspirin make me more likely to have a bleed?  He hadn't gotten my records yet and said he didn't know. What I've learned over the years is that aspirin, taken in low doses, is good for your heart. Your heart can throw clots, and those clots can cause a stroke if they make it to your brain. Since aspirin is a blood thinner, it reduces the chances that this will happen. Low-dose aspirin can also help your arterial walls widen, which increases blood flow, making it more difficult for a blood clot to form. Regular aspirin cannot do this. But I'm not a doc, so my best advice is to ask him/her.   Becky

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ok thanks, it's just that my primary is not a doctor (but a nurse practitioner) and didn't even seem that familiar with my case or about blood thinners.  But, I'll just ask my cardiologist who seems far more familiar with my situation.

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I agree, this is a question for a Doctor and hopefully one familiar with your health history. Also, everything I have read has said don't stop taking a medication (unless you are having an allergic reaction...contact health professional asap) until you discuss your concerns with you Doctor. Good luck, I wish I had a concrete answer but you need an answer from a health professional. Let us know how it goes. 🙂

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My neurologist, family doc and my wife (veterinarian) all agree that it's important to stay on aspirin or whatever other anticoagulants they prescribe, to reduce the chance of clots forming.  In my case, for example, a clot from an arterial dissection caused my stroke.

 

The consensus from my gaggle of medics is that the only downside is that shaving nicks can bleed for some time.  The upside is that they reduce the change of clots forming and causing another stroke.

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Tyrusrex you might want to inquire about switching to a dedicated MD. Not that a NP is not a capable healyhcare provider but if I were in your position it would worry me too. Especially if he/she seems not very familiar with your medical issues. I would let them know your concerns and inquire if you can change PCP, even for feeling better about the situation. Let them know if it causes stress...stress is something a stroke survivor should steer clear of. I'm mouthy with little filter since the stroke so I would say something right away lol. I would encourage you to at least inquire about change. Maybe your insurance would be happy to help you find a Physician you would feel comfortable with. Best of wishes.

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Hi,

 

It's been my experience that anytime I've seen a NP or PA, they routinely need to run everything by an MD. (That in Vermont - other locations - ??)

 

I had a massive hemorrhage in 1996, and I've taken a baby aspirin, (81mg) a day for years. (Though that's me.)

 

:smile:

 

 

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I think you are exactly right Becky. I know they work under a Dr. and what they do is evaluate and approve a patient's care. Again, I'm in TN. It could be different elsewhere.

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You're not Becky are you. 😳

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For the first year after my stroke, I would be evaluated by the NP, who would fill out my chart and then call the Neurologist who would chat for 5 minutes about running (we're both runners).  I  ended up transferring to a different (teaching) hospital.  Now the NP takes my vitals, and the Neurologist & his student spend about an hour going over every possible thing. 

 

The outcome is the same, though.  No change.

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