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tyrusrex

Hemorrhagic stroke and Aspirin

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Hey, I had a hemorrhagic stroke last year.  And a few months ago, I switched health plans and got a new primary who happens to be a nurse practitioner.  She added to my prescription a daily dose of aspirin.   Just a few days ago, I read that aspirin could be bad especially if one suffered from a hemorrhagic stroke.  I asked my primary about this and she said to keep taking the aspirin and ask when I next see my cardiologist.  Is this a good idea?  My primary said that it's only a low dose aspirin, but I really don't see a need especially since my stroke was due to extreme hypertension and I don't have a risk of clotting due to excessive cholesterol.    Should I continue taking a low dose aspirin or should I stop taking aspirin completely?  My next appointment with my cardiologist is in early March.

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 Hi great question. I would continue taking it for your doctor put you want it but I would also contact them and inquire that you recently read something that it could be bad for people who’ve had an isometric stroke. One of the hardest things that we do , I know I do, is to go online and Read possible side effects or health risks for common ailments  that I may have. I’m not saying a stroke is a common ailment but always contact your doctor before you do or change anything. 

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I, too, had a hemorrhagic stroke, and asked my primary the exact same question. My concern was that aspirin is a blood thinner, and I wondered if I had another would aspirin make me more likely to have a bleed?  He hadn't gotten my records yet and said he didn't know. What I've learned over the years is that aspirin, taken in low doses, is good for your heart. Your heart can throw clots, and those clots can cause a stroke if they make it to your brain. Since aspirin is a blood thinner, it reduces the chances that this will happen. Low-dose aspirin can also help your arterial walls widen, which increases blood flow, making it more difficult for a blood clot to form. Regular aspirin cannot do this. But I'm not a doc, so my best advice is to ask him/her.   Becky

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ok thanks, it's just that my primary is not a doctor (but a nurse practitioner) and didn't even seem that familiar with my case or about blood thinners.  But, I'll just ask my cardiologist who seems far more familiar with my situation.

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I agree, this is a question for a Doctor and hopefully one familiar with your health history. Also, everything I have read has said don't stop taking a medication (unless you are having an allergic reaction...contact health professional asap) until you discuss your concerns with you Doctor. Good luck, I wish I had a concrete answer but you need an answer from a health professional. Let us know how it goes. 🙂

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My neurologist, family doc and my wife (veterinarian) all agree that it's important to stay on aspirin or whatever other anticoagulants they prescribe, to reduce the chance of clots forming.  In my case, for example, a clot from an arterial dissection caused my stroke.

 

The consensus from my gaggle of medics is that the only downside is that shaving nicks can bleed for some time.  The upside is that they reduce the change of clots forming and causing another stroke.

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Tyrusrex you might want to inquire about switching to a dedicated MD. Not that a NP is not a capable healyhcare provider but if I were in your position it would worry me too. Especially if he/she seems not very familiar with your medical issues. I would let them know your concerns and inquire if you can change PCP, even for feeling better about the situation. Let them know if it causes stress...stress is something a stroke survivor should steer clear of. I'm mouthy with little filter since the stroke so I would say something right away lol. I would encourage you to at least inquire about change. Maybe your insurance would be happy to help you find a Physician you would feel comfortable with. Best of wishes.

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Hi,

 

It's been my experience that anytime I've seen a NP or PA, they routinely need to run everything by an MD. (That in Vermont - other locations - ??)

 

I had a massive hemorrhage in 1996, and I've taken a baby aspirin, (81mg) a day for years. (Though that's me.)

 

:smile:

 

 

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I think you are exactly right Becky. I know they work under a Dr. and what they do is evaluate and approve a patient's care. Again, I'm in TN. It could be different elsewhere.

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You're not Becky are you. 😳

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For the first year after my stroke, I would be evaluated by the NP, who would fill out my chart and then call the Neurologist who would chat for 5 minutes about running (we're both runners).  I  ended up transferring to a different (teaching) hospital.  Now the NP takes my vitals, and the Neurologist & his student spend about an hour going over every possible thing. 

 

The outcome is the same, though.  No change.

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I am taking 1 81mgs aspirin a day. 

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Don’t you hate it?

Something we need makes us bleed our own blood?

I can bleed for ages from a tiny scratch.

 

One of my MANY neuros is a guy called Graeme Hankey. He was in the US during the 80’s and was one of the ones who pioneered aspirin after a stroke.

 

 

Gentlemen:  Read at Your On Peril!

 

My period became so bad, I had to have an implant to stop them altogether.

 

Not only as I bleeding too much, I couldn’t cope with it all one handed.

 

 

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*Warning: female issue post (for anyone just heads up in case you want to skip). 

 

Ugh... Sooooo true. I forever have bruises I have no idea where I get. 

Janelle... When I had my stroke I was having female issues. I had a 3 month period like I was being murdered everyday (so sorry for the unsettling words). 2 weeks before I had it I went to the Dr for my Inability to walk to the bathroom without passing out. My hemoglobin was about 7 and my hematocrit was 23. SEVERE ANEMIA!!! I had the stroke the bleeding continued and after finding out 2 months later was on 325mg of aspirin everyday. I could have bought stock in pads 😕! I had to have 5 or six infusions over a year to try and get it OK. My Hematologist had a substitute one day (female...not Dr. Sheppard) and she spoke with me woman to woman. Go find out why. It hadn't even crossed my mind but not much did at that time. I went to find out... I had uterine pre-cancer... Had a complete hysterectomy by a Oncologist Gyneologist and thank Lord everything was contained. I had one more infusion and have been normal (hemoglobin and hematocrit) ever since. The aspirin was a mitigating factor in my being on the verge of full Exsanguination. 

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Tracy wow!! That's terrible! So glad you found out the cause.

Too often I put things down to This, but it isn't always the case. 

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Haha I was just glad Dr Sheppard had a substitute for him that day who was a woman lol. He knew but it didn't cross either of our minds 🤔. She basically said go to the Gyno Tracy. It made a lot of sense. 

 

Janelle, I am glad I went when I did and all turned out well. I am absolutely thrilled that mother nature does not visit me anymore. I do still have my ovaries but that's all. I have now traded menstrual pads for the occasional urine leak guard pads (like now when I'm coughing non stop 🙄). 🥂🎊🤣💁‍♀️✌️👏💓...celebrates. 

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Phew!  That sounds like a pretty close call; thank goodness you had the female locum.  

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Amen Paul....after stroke Tracy needed a heads up lol. I feel like I am being watched over. :humming:

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Absolutely amen to that Tracy. 

It's nice to know we are being watched over.

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It is so very nice Janelle. Helps me to remember that when I am in a huge stress moment. 

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I'm kinda late to the topic but, I would add that I had a minor heart attack Sept 2018 and just a stent and roto router job on a valve. Before I was discharged my Cardiologist from the hospital prescribed a couple of meds that I need to take daily and among them an 81mg Aspirin that needs to be taken daily. That was one of my concerns having read in the past of it being a blood thinner. 

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Will, Most of us will be taking that blood thinner treatment. The major problem with it is that one must not stop taking it, so like the rest of us you are tied to it for life.

Deigh

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6 hours ago, Deigh said:

Will, Most of us will be taking that blood thinner treatment. The major problem with it is that one must not stop taking it, so like the rest of us you are tied to it for life.

Deigh

That is true unless your stroke was hemorrhagic and not a blockage. In that case you don't want anything that thins the blood. I'm not allowed to take any aspirin.

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Will it still seems to depend on the patient and the root cause of the stroke. Listen to your doc.  But also blood "thinners" come in 2 basic types, and some can tolerate one but not the other, and which you end up taking after a stroke depends on all sorts of factors the type of stroke you had is just one of them.

Antiplatelet drugs are different to anticoagulent drugs. one stops clots the other reduces the small particles in the blood around which clots can form.  "Blood thinners don’t actually make your blood thinner. Nor can they break up clots. But they do keep blood from forming new clots. They can also slow the growth of existing ones."

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9 hours ago, heathber said:

Will it still seems to depend on the patient and the root cause of the stroke. Listen to your doc.  But also blood "thinners" come in 2 basic types, and some can tolerate one but not the other, and which you end up taking after a stroke depends on all sorts of factors the type of stroke you had is just one of them.

Antiplatelet drugs are different to anticoagulent drugs. one stops clots the other reduces the small particles in the blood around which clots can form.  "Blood thinners don’t actually make your blood thinner. Nor can they break up clots. But they do keep blood from forming new clots. They can also slow the growth of existing ones."

I'm glad I don't need them. I take 2 pills a day for blood pressure and I and don't want any other pharmaceuticals and their side effects unless I absolutely need them. When I check my BP at home at home it is always good and when I visit my Doc he tells me it's perfect every time. I still suspect aspirin had a lot to do with my bleed. I had the flu a few weeks before (too stubborn to get the flu shot back then) and was taking a lot of Bayer aspirin for relief. I heard someone say that if aspirin came out now the FDA would not so readily approve it.

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