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I had a TIA vacationing with my family, in Seattle went to Providence hospital received amazing care. I was in for 3 days. came out with a mild aphasia little else 

I have a 100% blockage in the left carotid artery. Back to work after 2 weeks i own a business in the midwest  I am so lucky. went to 6 sessions speech therapy

i'm struggling with my speech, getting better. 

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 Hi double D welcome to the site. I’m so glad that you’re doing as well as you are considering your ordeal in Seattle.

Have you had your blockage fixed?

 

 I too have problems with aphasia. One point of advice that I could give is : please don’t feel rushed and explain to people that having aphasia is a loss of words not intelligent. 

 One thing that I struggle with from time to time is other people finishing my sentences. I go through a Jekyll and Hyde mentality because sometimes I look to others to help me finish my sentences however I do have more times that I struggle with finding the words and I don’t want anyone to help me . just let me get to it myself!

 Also talking over someone else speaking or loud noises is also challenging. I fine going into a quiet room to gather my thoughts and then try to speak. I also find if I write stuff down it sometimes helps me . unfortunately , I am a horrible speller so they’ll have to have the same problem reading my spelling as I do waiting for  my words. 🙈🤭🙉  

 

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Hi,DD, You're definitely lucky- it could've been so much worse. I don't have aphasia, but some who do have posted here that there are places on-line that you can go to that will help you with that. I've never been to one, so I don't have any addresses for you. Sorry. Good luck,Becky

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Thanks for the info good to know. Working seems to be good therapy though I regret not taking more time off at first. My family was concerned  had rushed back, they where right.  The weather has been a issue snow and ice slowing me down 

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I’m scheduled for a CT on the 19 we’ll make a plan after that.

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Hi DoubleD, welcome to the Stroke Network. I'm so happy for you that you are doing very well after the TIA in Seattle. Certainly not a planned adventure while you are vacationing! 🙂 I have a form of aphasia as well...anomic aphasia. One word explanation...frustrating. Like Kelli, people tend to want to finish my sentences, or think that I have lowered intelligence or faculties. I've had to learn to be a bit tough on the surface and also to speak up and let those speaking to me know and better understand that I have aphasia and my intelligence and faculties are intact I just need a little extra time to find and get out what I'm saying. Please be patient! Pretty please! 😉 Yes easier said than done, but I try. With your speech therapy and time your's should improve. Hearing that you have a 100% blockage in the left carotid artery made me pause. TIA can sometimes be a good predicter for a full on stroke. Have your Doctor's addressed your blockage? I sure hope so. I know I'm not just speaking for myself when I say I look forward to your positive progress. Thanks for sharing your story and I look forward to seeing you around. Feel free to check out the site's gallery, forums, blogs, chat (scheduled), member bios, stories, testimonials and informative links. Nice to meet you btw...I'm Tracy.

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I too have a full blockage (healed closed after the dissection that caused my stroke) of one carotid artery (in my case right side). It's not really a problem unless something else happens that lowers your blood pressure significantly. In fact my doctors said to me on the bright side it actually reduces your chance of a second stroke, there's no blood flow there so there's no clots being formed or moving.  I live a pretty full and active life without that artery so don't stress about it unless your doctor sees a need to do something and even then listen to the doctor.

 

Going back to work so soon may have been unwise, but if you are coping OK with it go for it. Just don't push yourself too hard too fast and give yourself healing time as well.This things knocks you in ways you may not have realised at first.  Listen to your body and rest if and when you need to.

All the best

-Heather

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Double D, welcome to the site, going back to work will be ideal treatment for your aphasia, lots of opportunity for conversation will really make those face muscles work. After four years of struggling to make myself understood I had a great compliment payed to me after a computer problem sorting session with a local librarian who has known me from the beginning, She said that my speaking had improved. Now, this is excellent because it was unsolicited, asking friends and relatives whether I've improved is unsatisfactory because their reply is automatically favourable.

Regards

Deigh

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I'm really pleased that the librarian took the time to compliment you on your improvement. It must have strengthened your determination to keep going.

Regards to you and your wife.

Elizabethc

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That's great Deigh! I can completely get why this compliment really meant something...not that any others did not but I understand.

I also am glad that you commented about your blockage Heather! DoubleD this is why this forum is great...so many different survivors and so many different experiences that are many times so helpful in our own story. As for me, I let out a sigh of relief...I didn't realize that. I also agree with Heather, listen to your body, it's so easy to push ahead to soon. 😕 I hate to say it but your brain and body after stroke will push you right back. They have a lot of recovery after a stroke. I love your attitude though...a fighter is the perfect adversary!

 

Rereading the thread I referred to your TIA as a stroke. It is a mini stroke, however, and can give you very similar challenges. With a fighting spirit and the blessing that it was a TIA and not a completed stroke...I think you'll kick this TIA's bum!

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Double D, If you feel that you went back to work too soon, chances are that you did. Congratulations on listening to your body, btw. Let your life revolve around work and rest right now. Go to work, come home, do what you absolutely have to do, then go to bed. Some survivors find that going back to work is easier if it's done gradually, like working 1/2 days or only 3 days per week. This way you have downtime built into your schedule, and you can get plenty of rest between work days. Don't worry, this won't last forever! The plan is to gradually work yourself up to full time. Good luck, Becky

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On ‎2‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 5:36 PM, elizabethc said:

I'm really pleased that the librarian took the time to compliment you on your improvement. It must have strengthened your determination to keep going.

Regards to you and your wife.

Elizabethc

absolutely … 

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On ‎2‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 7:29 PM, becky1 said:

Double D, If you feel that you went back to work too soon, chances are that you did. Congratulations on listening to your body, btw. Let your life revolve around work and rest right now. Go to work, come home, do what you absolutely have to do, then go to bed. Some survivors find that going back to work is easier if it's done gradually, like working 1/2 days or only 3 days per week. This way you have downtime built into your schedule, and you can get plenty of rest between work days. Don't worry, this won't last forever! The plan is to gradually work yourself up to full time. Good luck, Becky

that is so true and can't be said enough. Working less than what we 'think' we should be is a mental fudge ball but it is true. 

I used to work 2 jobs at a time.. 1 full time and one part and worked on less than 4 hours sleep a day and kicked butt..now…..

I can only do about 3 days a week with at least two says in between so I can recharge.. Now that works for me but you have to remember you are still in the early stages of your recovery. It's hard for us knowing we can't do a simple task that we did for years. We've ALL been there and some still can't , to this day, but we all understand we have to start of slow. Your brain got hurt and lost the pathways it once had to talk to you body ( muscles, coordination) so your brain is telling your body; " We got this, we are still awesome!"

So you jump back in feet first to run with the news your brain is telling you.  BUT.. you are very tired, you can't do what you did.  That's normal. Your brain has to work twice as hard to get your body to listen. Ok Try to picture this  hold spaghetti noodles and hold them in the middle and crack them. that's what the stroke did. It broke up the usual pathways so the brain has to find new pathways. that comes with recovery. It's ok to take your time. It's hard  remember every stroke and recovery is different,

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