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Hi, all.

 

I'm new here, having joined the "club" on Christmas Eve when I lost the use of my right side.

 

I've recovered fairly well, but I plateaued a while back.  The daily struggle is getting to be a real challenge.

 

I'm glad to be here, and I look forward to participating on this forum.

 

Thanks.

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Scott, Welcome to the forum. If you had a stroke last Christmas Eve then you should not be concerned about plateauing. I am in  my fifth year of recovery and still showing improvements. True they are hard fought for but are there nevertheless. I guess you are right handed as am I. Am I correct? Please tell us a bit more about your stroke and its effects on your life.

Deigh

 

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Deigh's right- it's way too early to think you have plateaued. In fact, you don't ever plateau, you just slow down. Recovery san on-going process. You may not even see progress because improvements occur in small increments over a long period of time. And, sometimes, you can only see progress by looking backward and noticing that there are things that you can do now that you couldn't do a year ago,or 2 yrs. ago. Or, you'll realize that something is easier to do now than it was 5 yrs. ago, 6 mos. ago,or a year ago. The time frames may vary, but the message is the same:  Improvements may occur without your knowing it. So, hang in there, don't give up, and throw that term "plateau" out the window.   Becky

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Thank you for the replies.

 

I'm left-handed, something to be grateful for having lost my right side.  At least I can write and type (however slowly).

 

You are both right that I try to keep a positive outlook -- at first, I couldn't even sit up in bed.  Then was able to stand (supported), and I've regained some mobility.  I went from needing a wheelchair to a walker to a quad cane to a single-point, and now I can even walk short distances (a few hundred feet) on my own.

 

I try not to get too frustrated...

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I'm righthanded and lost my right side. I consider this to be fortunate because it made me use my left hand to do all sorts of things it couldn't handle before. I learned how to write left handed and do all the jobs that my right hand used to do. After a year I started to swing back to using my right hand and for a while I could write equally badly with both! My left hand is still called into service to do sensitive things my right hand is too clumsy with like washing my right ear.

My touch typing now is rather unique, my left hand hits all the keys it was trained to do but my right hand just uses the thumb and two fingers. I really should start using them all and this letter has made me start doing that!

Don't forget to fill in the details of your stroke and lifestyle into your profile so we can know more about you.

Deigh

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It is a pleasure to meet you. Yes, this 'club' isn't sought after but the members here are wonderful. Reading Deigh and Becky words are very true. Don't think like you've plateaued for every day your body and brain are healing. True, you may not see all the healing but it is happening and that is frustrating for sure, 

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Hi Scott. you are not quite six months into this journey. And a journey it is. Frustration and even despair are the hallmarks of that first stage. Keep in mind that the physical healing of your brain is only now starting to finish. So now is when you really start rebuilding. "Recovery" up til now has been the "easy" stuff that was probably more affected by inflammation than actual loss of brain function. So yes it feels like you have plateaued (as the insurance likes to say, they don't want to spend any more money on you) but that just means you have reached the point where the easy gains have been made and what you get from here will require much more work and perseverance. Time to engage your inner stubborn b*****.

Stubborn is you friend on this journey as are we.

 

Ask any questions you want, we can help with strategies that have worked for us even if we are not medicos. In some ways we know more having lived through this. And yes recovery continues long after the insurance company thinks you should stop. Yes some of it is just learning easier (more efficient) ways of getting things done, but a lot of it is the slow improvement of connection and control.  Keep working and repeating to rebuild your strength. that walking thing is tricky but achievable. I too lost my non dominant side completely.  I still don't walk fast but I can walk a couple of kms when I need to. I exhausts me but I can do it.  The main thing is don't give up, you only know where your limits really are by pushing against them.  This doesn't mean take silly risks. If you are going to push a limit asses the risk and have a plan for failure just in case!  Other than that go for it. Life is for living get out there and do it!

-Heather

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