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A couple of us have mentioned weight gain on the site recently. 

 

It's not something I have thought to discuss here, I don't think. 

 

Anyway, I put on 20kg / 44lbs since the beginning. 

 

Over the last two years, I have managed to lose 10kg / 22lbs.

 

So I'm still quite a lot heavier than my original weight. 

 

When I got married in 1999, I weighed 80kg / 176lbs.  Due to bad advice after having my gall bladder out in 2002, I've really struggled with maintaining an ok weight.

 

But these days it's so hard. Not just physically, but mentally as well.

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Janelle I very much relate. I have gained 60 lbs since my stroke. Lost 12...its a daily struggle. 

 

I am exhausted every day. I have sort of come to terms that I'm not going to join aerobics anytime soon lol. But I do try to walk. I can't walk outdoors during the summer. I have asthma and just having the stroke doesn't allow me to tolerate the heat and humidity. 

 

My goals have been to eat whole foods and no packaged foods. Try to stay away from sugar. Nothing has been clearly a winner. 

 

I am just 80% less active than I was before. Already had extra weight then. I worked 8 hours a day on my feet running around like crazy. Very fast paced environment. 

 

My new goal is to work in broken up time. My Psychiatrist wants me to concentrate on trying to work up to 30 minutes of real exercise every day. It's OK if it's 10 minutes at a time. This is for brain health and to help my cognitive decline from continuing. 

 

I am in a moment where I am really working on loving me no matter. For my health I know extra weight is not good. I realize though I may not be able to improve that to my satisfaction but can continue to improve to where I can make progress in my health. 

 

It's hard for me. I was the skinny, healthy teen and young woman. When I started to gain weight with no change in foods I was finally diagnosed with PCOS. This makes gaining easy and losing hard. So I'm just going to learn to love my curves. I have to 🙂

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You go girl! We love curvy Tracy!

 

If you eat well, and by that, I include treats. We are human after all.

 

If you eat well, and manage 30 minutes of exercise in 10 minute increments, it's all good.

 

We are who we are.

 

My maiden name is McKay. 

My dad, uncles, great uncles, all tall blokes. Not huge, but tall.

My generation, brothers, cousins, second cousins. 

 

Well. All tall. All built like brick dunnies.

 

Even us girls. Two of us are 6 foot plus, and the other girls are 5 10 plus.

 

As we've aged, besides operations and strokes, we've all filled out. Boys and girls. All tall and gangly to all tall and big.

 

So even though I blame it on not exercising, a lot of it is genes.

 

It's who we are Tracy. It's who we are meant to be.

 

The struggle is real. If we let it be a struggle. 

 

It's who we are.  But it doesn't define us.

 

It's what's in the heart that defines us.

And you, my lovely, your heart is the biggest part of you.

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Thank you so much Janelle. Those are meaningful words to me. 🙂 I have made it a struggle for a long time...since about a year after my stroke I made a decision that I don't want to do that anymore. Time to heal that wound. Janelle, my friend, your heart is massive! ♥️

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Hi folks this speaks to me at the moment too. I got into very bad habits with food after my gall bladder surgery, and re-found all the weight I lost when sick and some friends for it.  Like you Janelle I'm built big, 176 tall (just under 6' in the old measures) When super fit and healthy I weigh 85-90kg, a large part of which is muscle. At the time of my stroke I weighed 105kg, which I consider overweight for me but not crazy, when I got home from rehab (5 months later) I was 91kg, and it wasn't muscle any more.  It's been a bit of a roller coaster since, although I have managed to stay under 100kg most of the time.  I'm currently working with a nutritionist to get my food back on track and my weight with it, it's been a pretty drastic change in eating habits but I think it's working and I think I can maintain it long term. But I'm never going to be thin, beside I've been thin and it's not pretty or comfortable. I remember semi permanent bruises on my pelvic bones, and that was long before living on asprin. 

Whatever happens with my weight I need to accept that I'm going to physically dominate most rooms I go into. So I need to love me and be confident. And what others think or see doesn't matter.

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1 hour ago, heathber said:

I need to accept that I'm going to physically dominate most rooms I go into. So I need to love me and be confident. And what others think or see doesn't matter.

 

Heather this is so true.

 

Like you, I’m tall.  I’ve always had a physical presence, and now it’s definitely noticeable.

 

I definitely need to love this me...getting there...I think.

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yes it takes time and will to do it. This is one thing I love about my nutritionist. She works just as hard on my mental health and self image as she does on the food itself. It's a pleasure to go to my fortnightly check in, she's all about "what's working, what isn't, what do we need to tweak?" and there is no "bad" food, there is just not so good food, so it's been about "more" not "less" the whole way, and once I was eating nutritionally dense calories it was actually more calories per day not less, which is actually hard to do.  I was amazed at how easy it's been and how quickly the body adjusts to eating real food. I've had very few cravings, so it's been easy to change.

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Heather you have hit the nail on the head.

 

It's the cravings that are the problem!

 

If cravings weren't a thing,  it would be so much easier!

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hardest part is it means cooking for myself, so I know what's in things. Which means shopping and cooking. Which I do enjoy but is ruddy hard work and means I have to be organised, and can't really afford to have a lazy weekend, when I do the following weeks food is less than ideal and it I pay the price.

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Exactly right, Heather. 

If We head to the shops with no list, or meal plan, it's not a great week of meals!

 

I must admit the kids do most of their own cooking.  Connor has food allergies and Carrah is a vegetarian. 

Wayne works shift work, and I don't like eating thingsthat people need to cut up for me!

 

We manage, but it's not well managed. 

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yep my cooking is no longer "pretty" but it doesn't need a knife at meal times and it tastes good.  Let's just say I'm never inviting Gordan Ramsey to dinner.

 

Here's a recipe from my childhood that Carrah might like to try. I've recently started making these again as they are easy (although a bit messy) and can be eaten cold for work lunches.  good protein and low gi carb. Can be frozen once cooked.

 

walnut/oatmeal rissoles

scant cup rolled oats  this is rolled oats not quick oats, if you use quick oats they'll fall apart.

1 large egg

1/2 cup crushed walnuts. Walnuts crush easily with a fork.

1 medium onion finely chopped (I usually blitz it in the food processor, if I'm feeling lazy chuck the walnuts in the blitz too, although that gives a much softer result) if you want crunchy bits take the time to fork the walnuts.

1tsp dried herbs ( basil or oregano, or whatever you like)

mix all ingredients together then add water until it's a slightly sloppy dough, 1/2 to 1 cup. let the mix stand for 30 minutes for the oats to absorb the water. final mix should be slightly wet but not sloppy, should hold together when you spoon it onto the pan. then cook on a frypan or griddle, like you would ordinary meat patties.

 

And yes when the shopping isn't planned, nobody will starve in my house unless they are really trying hard but the nutritional quality will not be as desired.

 

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Please don't hate me for this (just teasing) but you know how they tell us  "well everybody's stroke affects them differently"? Well I didn't want to eat for the longest time. I only ate because I knew it was important to. My spouse buys organic when available, eats a hugh home hand made salad for lunch each work day, that kind of stuff. So I was being fed good things but even though I could taste it I didn't especially want it. Often back then I would allow myself to eat things I did not ordinarily eat very often like McDonald's or Oreo cookies. Finally after 4 1/2 years I'm beginning to crave things again. I am 5' 9 1/2" (gotta get that 1/2 " in there) and am at what "they" say is the max weight for my height. I was about 10 to 15 pounds over that pre stroke.

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Will, that's it exactly!  I think that loss of desire to eat is not that uncommon. The first couple of years you lose weight because things don't taste "right" and you aren't really hungry but after that you start to gain and as you are less physically active its harder to get rid of any excess. remember that 1/2 inch is 1 whole cm so you certainly claim it

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Oh no! I will have to watch out for that because I do like where my weight is at now. Thank you for that insight.

 

 

 

 

You Can't See Numb

13 minutes ago, heathber said:

Will, that's it exactly!  I think that loss of desire to eat is not that uncommon. The first couple of years you lose weight because things don't taste "right" and you aren't really hungry but after that you start to gain and as you are less physically active its harder to get rid of any excess. remember that 1/2 inch is 1 whole cm so you certainly claim it

 

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I’m a bit late jumping in here, but I can really relate to this topic.  I was already severely overweight before my stroke, but my weight had been stable for several years.  After the stroke, my doctor started me on insulin, and over the first two months, I gained 50 pounds!!  And I was barely eating, because I had to go the ER every few days when I couldn’t breathe, and I quickly figured out that having food in my stomach left less room for my lungs to expand.  Once I realized the insulin was the problem, I figured out how to lose some of the extra weight, which led to a reduction in insulin, which got me to where I am now, about 30 of the 50 pounds lost.  I had actually lost even more last summer by eating whole foods and low amounts of carbs, but because of other health issues, I got back into my old way of eating, to the point where I was eating fast food for every meal, and lots of sugary desserts and snacks.  It was hard, but I’ve spent the past 4 months reducing how often I eat out (though I still find myself craving it, especially because I don’t have to cook it), but I can’t seem to get back into the healthy way I was eating last summer.  Part of it, I know, is that I haven’t had a homemaker for the past 5 1/2 months (Dept. of Human Services closed down my homemaker’s agency, and it’s almost impossible to find someone else), which means I have no help with cleaning up if I cook, plus I don’t have a way to get trash and recycling out every week - it’s taking over my kitchen, dining room, etc.  A couple times, I had a way to get it taken out, but that’s not much in over 5 months.  Also, I am having more leg pain than last summer, which makes it harder to stand/move around the kitchen for cooking or dish washing, let alone being able to run to the store for anything I missed during my weekly (assisted) trip.  Of course, it doesn’t hurt to sit and drive, so anywhere with a window calls my name!

 

Thanks for letting me gripe a little - I’m doing all kinds of sensible things to get back on track, I guess I just need to be patient and keep working at it!

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unfortunately there is no magic pill so yes you have to keep working on it. in home assistance here is organised through your GP and the local council when required. Can you ask your GP to help you find a new agency?  I have found that if you can cut out 98% of the carbs for at least a week or 2 your body readjusts it's sugar expectations and the cravings almost go away, but I bet that's different and possibly dangerous if you are taking insulin.  Healthy eating is always easier in summer! raw veg is just more appealing in the hot weather somehow. my go to for winter is soup! easy to make, easy to freeze in portions, ...  Hugs and keep up the good work - you will get there!

-Heather

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I may as well jump on the "need to lose weight" train as well as I DEFINATELY am there too. My main problem is that being confined to a wheelchair is not conducive to exercise. My main area of weight gain is my abdominal area which is due primarily to leading a sedentary lifestyle. If I bend forward, I get very dizzy. So, what am I to do? I just watch what I eat. This hasn't helped me lose weight, but I'm not gaining any more either. I"m trying to learn to live with this, but I'm not there yet. Mostly, I hate the way that I look.   Becky

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Becky, that's just it, isn't it?

Accepting the way we look.

People expect miracles with diet, but they are not in wheelchairs. 

I have no advice, but I do want to say we love you just as you are 💜💜💜

 

Consig, I understand the cooking problem. 

Don't beat yourself up about it. When you mentioned you don't have a support team at the moment...well, do what gets you by.

I tend to have cereal for lunch, as it's quick and easy.

Save my meal for night time, when family is around.

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