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ThomasB

54 - feel lucky, but scared...

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Lightening. That is about the best analogy I read about what happened to me, just sitting and the whole left side slowly goes numb. Throwing up, vertigo, had no idea what was happening. MRI and CT showed no stroke on the initial emergency visit, I was asked if I was an IV drug user. Took till just last week to determine I had a stroke with a contrast MRI.

 

I have a minor stroke, I feel very fortunate and it has been a long ride already as it was only 3-months ago. I lost partial feeling on my left side but retained all heat and cold sensation and my coordination is intact. I have total use of my limbs but experience a constant tingling and some pain.

 

I am terrified of having another one, or the one I have now getting worse. My neurologist is not very helpful as I am "another stroke survivor"  and I do not get much in the way of consol, like nill. I am grateful to find this forum. I cannot read an MRI so I have no idea where the stroke is but I am thinking it is the flocculonodular lobe.

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Hi Thomas, and welcome.  Lots of people here, lots and lots of experience of strokes.

 

I'm not a doctor, so can't give real medical advice.  I do know a whole pile of medics of different sorts and in different countries, and they all agree (often in private) that you need to advocate for yourself.  If you are not happy with the info from your stroke doc, tell him that you want more.  My experience has been that once they get ver the shock, most doctors prefer patients who are interested.  If he can't or won't give more information, ask for a referral to someone who can.  Or switch doctors.

 

I had something similar, in that they could not find the cause of my stroke, thought that it was a migraine, could not find lesions.  Took about three days before they found the torn artery and traced it to find the clots in my brain.  But three months to find the stroke!  Wow, that could not have been pleasant.

 

       paul

 

 

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Neuros tend to think that they live on a different plane than everyone else so don't interpret the lack of response as anything but poor bedside manner. In other words, I hope that you don't think that his lack of a response means anything other than he has poor communication skills. Then ask him a direct question, like "Do you know what caused my stroke?" and then decide what you want to do, based on his willingness to answer your question.

I had both tingling and numbness on my left side following my stroke. The tingling went away in all except my left hand some time  ago: Now 12 yrs. later, I still have the numbness. Your recovery could be very similar or different as each stroke is unique to that person.   Becky  

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Welcome to the club :angry:

Its a club no one wanted to join but it chose us so are we lucky or Fed up, I don't know.

Read lots and when you think you have it figured out read some more, there are lots of people that are smarter than some Dr's here

Live your life the best you can because its out of our hand's in other words don't worry about it as long as your seeing your Dr and taking your med's and stopping anything that could make it worse.

Good luck and welcome aboard

Ed

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Hi Thomas. Kick off your shoes and make yourself at home, you're definitely among some of the finest and helpful folks that know and totally understand what your going through. Not too much you could say that wouldn't surprise those here that share this same kind of burden. Our stories may vary, symptoms, durations, affected areas and experiences but we all have so much in common. I think it's healthy to talk about your stroke, until recently I've mainly just been in the background browsing and reading. I finally stepped out of the shadows and opened up a little. Most of the folks these days I come into close contact with really haven't any idea the struggles of a stroke survivor but having said that, there are a good many of fine folks that will go out of their way to try and help too if they can. It's quite a journey and this is a great resource for sharing and questions, so welcome!

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7 hours ago, will2 said:

Hi Thomas. Kick off your shoes and make yourself at home, you're definitely among some of the finest and helpful folks that know and totally understand what your going through. Not too much you could say that wouldn't surprise those here that share this same kind of burden. Our stories may vary, symptoms, durations, affected areas and experiences but we all have so much in common. I think it's healthy to talk about your stroke, until recently I've mainly just been in the background browsing and reading. I finally stepped out of the shadows and opened up a little. Most of the folks these days I come into close contact with really haven't any idea the struggles of a stroke survivor but having said that, there are a good many of fine folks that will go out of their way to try and help too if they can. It's quite a journey and this is a great resource for sharing and questions, so welcome!

will2  I think you have a new calling in life. That was so well written it was inspiring! Yes only the victim of a stroke really, really understands what is going on in our damaged bodies and brains. I loved my therapists when I was in in-house rehab and their help was priceless. Here again as good as they are at what they do and as much as they are around stroke victims even they aren't 100% er's like us. Keep those fingers typing William.

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4 hours ago, Willis said:

will2  I think you have a new calling in life. That was so well written it was inspiring! Yes only the victim of a stroke really, really understands what is going on in our damaged bodies and brains. I loved my therapists when I was in in-house rehab and their help was priceless. Here again as good as they are at what they do and as much as they are around stroke victims even they aren't 100% er's like us. Keep those fingers typing William.

Thanks Will. Rarely do I choke out a well written reply as most here do. I am however getting better, smoothing out the rough edges and keeping in mind that so much can be misinterpreted by how you say it. Especially after stroke, thoughts get so jumbled that what you read may be the second or third reply I typed, because when I often re-read it lacks the feeling I was going for or doesn't make a lot of sense and was deleted.

 

As the old saying goes "It takes one to know one" really applies being a stroker. I'm better understood here than any place I can think of outside of in-patient rehab.

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Hi Thomas,

 

my goodness. You have had the ride. I, to, have use of my limbs and in the beginning of healing ( first 1 year)  i had tingling as well. The fear of another stroke is real and scary but if you continue to follow the doctors advice and take good care of yourself. mentally and physically, you can be one step head of fear 🙂 

 Can you ask around, in the local hospital or rehabilitation hospital for suggestions for a new neuro.  You have to feel listened to

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Hi Thomas 

Welcome to the group.

Looking forward to sharing with you.

 

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