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I saw an orthopedic surgeon for my neck issues, he said they were related to my spassticity alone and not the degenerative discs.Recommended dry needling.

I've had two sessions, they improved my neck flexibility and my leg  tightness, but I am very fatigued today which is not uncommon.hopefully the positive results will remain when t he fatigue and mild pain are over.Napping today.

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Napping is good. As is needling. 

 

Fatigue, not so much. Hopefully that subsides for you.

💚

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I decided to continue needling on my neck and left arm, I find my legs are getting better from the strength training. ordered some gripping gloves to help also.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Heather my weak hand is constantly in a gist. Gripping is ok, it's releasing things. 

Not that I can hold stuff. Absolutely zero strength these days.

Is your gym shut? Not sure it had the chance to open?

💚👑

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Hi Janelle, yes my left hand lives in a fist, and I can't voluntarily release my grip but it also has a nasty tendency to let go without warning when I put a weight in it. Hence using the strap when doing bar or kettlebell work.  Also my trainer hovers ready to rescue me.

Gym went online for lockdown 1, then we had 2 weeks of live but restricted contact classes before lockdown 2 started. With this lockdown and mandatory closure of businesses they are finding it harder to keep the online content going as even the trainers aren't allowed to go to the gyms to create online content this time.  I'm doing my workouts at home with video supervision, not ideal and a bit limited but better than nothing.

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Yes, definitely better than nothing Heather.

I'm glad your trainer is nearby when you are lifting weights. 

That's the beauty of one on one compared to online, really. 

Yes, better than nothing, but not quite the same.

 

I was attending church online, particularly over Easter.

 

Even though we can shake hands during the peace, and no wine at the moment,  it's much better being in the church building than not.

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Sure have Paul.

It was really hard not going during the lockdown. 

 

In saying that, since the lockdown has been lifted here, I've been twice.

 

Laziness (from being home All The Time)  is a very hard habit to break.

 

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Wild digression, but apart from the peace and quiet and reflection, I have an extra-special gratitude for churches as sanctuary.

 

In my younger days in South Africa, a large number of our anti-Apartheid protests were held in churches.  The government and police were mostly deeply religious, so would never break up a church service, even if spouting sedition and unrest.  They'd wait to grad the churchgoers as they left.  Because of having a "white" skin, I could usually leave the church and walk straight towards any senior looking police.  The rank-and-file cops would gibe way, assuming that I was a spy or provocateur and let me pass.  I avoided arrest many times that way.

 

My wife was arrested in a protest with (among others) Arch-Bishop Desmond Tutu.  Lots and lots of priests in that particular march.  The entire crowd were marched to the local police station, where the assembled priests led the protestors in prayer.  The poor police did not know whether to doff their riot helmets and pray along with the protestors, tell everyone to be quiet, or just let it proceed. After the prayers, Linda used my tactic and just walked out, looking purposeful.  No-one tried to stop her. 

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Paul, can we discuss your presence in South Africa? I was evacuated out of Egypt during WW2 to Palestine and eventually to South Africa. I spent three years there as a schoolboy, returning To UK in 1944. I have returned there twice since and have been able to see the changes occurring. What was your reason for being there?

Deigh.

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Paul, wow . I respect all of what you said 

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Hi Deigh

 

I was born and raised in South Africa, met my wife and got married there.  We travelled a lot, and spent 3 years in Canberra while she tackled a PhD.  We moved to Canada after we had children; we lived on a farm and things were getting really scary (gunfire through  the nights, neighbours be robbed at gun-point) so we moved to Canada.  Been here for 16 years now.  We still miss SA, have family there and visit from time to time, but moving to Canada was the best thing that we could have done for  our children.

 

We lived all over the place when it was just the two of us, and I'm torn between Cape Town and the Highveld (North of Pretoria) where we farmed.

 

My father fought in Egypt during WW2 in the artillery.  His gun allegedly fired the opening shot of the second battle of El Alamein.

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Paul I'm so very grateful that you and Linda were brave enough to take part in protests.

SA sounds scary. My doctor is from SA as well. His wife is from Zimbabwe. 

They too moved to Canada, then came here. 

 

Canberra is the worst place on the planet for street signs!

 

Deigh, wow. An experience not to be forgotten. 

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Paul, My sister married  a South African and moved there with him to Northern Rhodesia where  he worked as an electrician in the mines. He served with the South African forces in the war and spent most of his service fighting in Italy. After the taking over by the local politicians there they fled with their 3 kids to Southern Rhodesia. We tried to talk him to come to UK but stubbornly he refused and ultimately had to abandon SR and flee to South AFrica. About 30years ago we did a world trip and last call was South Africa where I was able to see my Nephews and neices for the first time. Eventually both my sister and her husband died and their family has now mostly moved to UK.

I was in Southern Rhodesia learning to fly with the RAF in the 50's and loved the country but when my wife and I decided to emigrate from UK we chose the safety of New Zealand, and never regretted it.

Deigh

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I am fascinated by this entire thread! First, Alan I'm glad you are finding some helpful treatments. I'm headed to an Orthopedic Specialist in a week due to pain, soreness, even sensation changes under my left shoulder blade and heck I 've had weird pain from front under ribs, under my arm pit, and my shoulder as well. Not sure what it is althoughmy PCP thinks it could be musculoskeletal around whole left ribcage and shoulder blade. Feeling positive hope for feeling better reading your story. (I dont have issues with spasticity I don't think but the nature of my stroke in the cerebellum affects my posture and tone. I'm too loosy goosy lol. Paul and Deigh both of your life stories amaze me! I am sorta sheltered here in Tennessee in the US. (Who would have thought lol). Again, amazed!

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It's always fascinating to hear others life stories. I've been so ordinary. Living my whole life here in Melbourne.  Tracy the pain you describe in your shoulder and ribs sounds very familiar. Although for me it's the left side because my left arm doesn't work so it drags on that side of my body.  One of the things that happens when they botox my arm is that my left side straightens up. Even though the arm is actually heavier the rest of me seems to stop fighting it and the improvement in my posture and walking is significant.  I do hope they can find a fix for you.

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Heather me too! Been 2-3 months now every day. Doc says we'll put you on Meloxicam (NSAID) and well minor relief that disappeared once the course of meds were done... and exacerbated tummy issues to boot! 😣 I am praying there is an actual diagnosis based on more than just "here take this". I'll let you know. 

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It does seem to be one where manual therapies seem to be the best you can do, although those are hard to access in our current situation and results are generally short lived, as in it wears off fast, but if anti inflammatory helped, that does suggest it's muscular tension or similar. Fingers crossed for a workable solution and relief without too much delay.

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With my sister and mother we were evacuated to Margate in Natal.

400 displaced RAF women and children, the kin of men serving in Egypt, suddenly descended on the town and we took over all their hotels in 1940. About the same number of army families went to the next town down the coast Ramsgate! We all returned to UK before the war ended in 1944. We never really found out why we were there, originally  we were evacuated to Palestine and were suddenly taken out of there and put on a troopship expecting to return to UK. The story these days is that South Africa felt sorry for us and took us all in in an emergency move.

Deigh

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Tracy musculoskeletal?

No. Not a word. Not a thing.

There's always something isn't there?

My shoulder hurts constantly. My physio straps it every four weeks.

And yes, Heather, I find my arm is very heavy.

My shoulder comes out of the socket and I have to push it back in.

Does that sound musculoskeletal? Seeing the doctor this week; have to add it to my list.

Oh the joys.

💚👑

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Hi Janelle, yes that is a musculoskeletal deficit. Called shoulder subluxation.  You shoulder joint is actually held together with muscle, unlike most other joints where the bone structure holds it together. The shoulder joint can't be done that way because it needs to be able to move in so many different ways and directions.  So your shoulder needs the rotator cuff muscles to be functional.

After stroke it is very common to have a weak shoulder joint. This is one reason they like to put us into a sling during acute care so that the muscles don't become over stretched.  God I hated that sling 😞  Thankfully very early in my rehab I used a TENS in muscle contraction mode on my shoulder that taught my brain to hold that joint together again. I learnt to put the electrodes on myself and I would run it for 2 or 3 hours a day (working up from the starting mode of 5 - 10 minutes at a time). It took about a month but I did get back enough muscle tone and control that I don't have a sublux problem now except after botox and then I can pull it back voluntarily as soon as I realise it's loose.

 

Remember strapping is a band aid not a fix. You need to also work on rebuilding the muscle, if you don't want to be dependent on that strapping for the rest of your life.

 

Was at my physio this morning and got the lecture about moving about a lot more than I have been, so that I'll be in a position to start using services once they reopen, rather than having to rebuild before I can really get started again. I've been given a "doctor's note" for being out twice a day (our lockdown rules say one exercise session outside the home per day for 1 hour)

 

 

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Just a little update since my visit to the Orthopedic Specialist last Friday. Dr. Byram seemed to understand where my pain was coming from... He was really good at reproducing it! 😳 Diagnosis: Scapular dyskinesia, empinged shoulder, and cervical radiculitis. So off of Meloxicam and onto (larger than I've ever taken) steroids and starting a 2 month at least PT with suggestion from Dr. Byram for dry needling. Ha I found that interesting since it was a discussion here. I go next Wednesday to my intake appt for PT. I will be on these steroids for 12 days (thankfully I'm past 5). I have been just down right ill from taking and reducing my doses of the steroid. I went back to my PCP today just for peace of mind because I seriously have felt so bad. Headache, nausea, weird sensations, heart palpitations, belly button palpitations (yep one of the reasons for seeing my PCP today), change in eating (I've lost 14 lbs since July just from not feeling well so not all steroids), pressure in my head, asthma has been perking up, extreme weakness, dizziness, blurry vision, slowed reflexes, increased anxiety, can't sleep well, increased blood sugar levels... I feel like you name it I'm having it. Thankfully, my belly button is not gong to explode anytime soon. Dr. Coil says it is all steroid related and unfortunately the only help is titrating off. The tone issues from my stroke are a big factor and it's causing terrible posture therefore leading to all the pain and issues. He says he is having them work from my neck down past my shoulder blade and work on strength and stability. Well, I suppose this has become more of a whine session that update haha. Ouch! 3:15 am again...another sleepless night. Got any cheese for that whine? 

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On 8/12/2020 at 12:51 PM, GreenQueen said:

Heather my weak hand is constantly in a gist. Gripping is ok, it's releasing things. 

Not that I can hold stuff. Absolutely zero strength these days.

Is your gym shut? Not sure it had the chance to open?

 

💚👑

i get the gist -you meant fist, its a touchy subject.

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