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anyone get past Spasticity?I read it is a stage of recovery, but the book did not say if it goes away.

It is a plague for me daily.Left side face, neck, shoulder, arm,leg all of it. 

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My stroke was almost 20 years ago.  Immediately after I experienced severe spasticity.  Over the years I've been told that mine is on the high end most health providers have seen.  Have tried  every remedy available with no success.  I'm currently on a medication that eases it a bit,but as far as recovery I have a long way to go.  Wishing you all the best.

~Beth

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Alan. I'm now around 13yrs post stroke and if anything, the spasticity has got a bit more pronounced in my left arm/hand. Sometimes it feels like a bag of hard sand, no feeling except the numbness and tightening. The only positive relief over the years for temporary relief has been to stretch the muscles out, if possible daily each morning. The only other thing that has been suggested in another thread on this topic is to try medication, and Baclofen had been suggested, by Becky if I remember. Anyway I ask my primary care physician if I could try it and he decided that it wouldn't be in my best interests for a prescription. His concerns my other meds for my heart, in addition to 2 other meds would be excessive, so I agreed.

 

I have heard that Baclofen is prescribed for spasticity issues, so others may benefit. Good luck!

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I had major problems with spasticity and clonus in my left calf for the first couple of years. It goes away if/when you can get the muscle working. One of the main reliefs I had was using the bioness (FES) for walking. Spasticity is a muscle self defense mechanism when the nerve signals are not fully received. the muscle turns on and stays on because that is "safer" than relaxing. So the more you can rewire/use and make the muscle feel safe the less spasticity you should have. Meds like Baclofen make the muscles relax in the whole body, which can create other problems, like difficulty walking because you have less control over everything, here it tends to only be prescribed for very severe cases and people who are not otherwise "high functioning".  Botox can also be used to relax specific muscles for a limited period, and creates a window of opportunity for you to teach the muscles and nerves new patterns.  In theory you should have less spacticity after a botox treatment and therapy, it does come back but not as badly. unfortunately botox is expensive and a waste if not used in conjunction with some pretty intense therapy. I do get botox treatment in my arm every so often, and it's a great help for 3 - 6 months, but over time because I can't get that arm functional it comes back. regular passive stretching and general exercise helps, as well as physio manipulation and soft tissue work to relax the muscles, but it's not a long term/permanent fix its just temporary relief.

 

For the record other than some dystonia in my toes my leg is now mostly free from spasticity. But my non functional arm and hand have both spacticty and dystonia,and it spreads into my shoulder and torso and affects my gait and posture, so arm botox for me is usually about general mobility, not arm function,  and it makes some things worse for a while because I do use the claw for some things, and I lose that while the botox is strong.

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Hi Alan

 

I take baclofen. 

 

My spasticity was getting really painful. Not the actual shaking part, but the build up to the shaking. 

 

It's so much better now.

 

I find my hand and arm remain the same, but with using my recumbent bike my leg is better.

 

I'm 6 1/2 years out.

 

💚👑

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Deigh Spasticity is where a muscle contracts uncontrollably, it usually happens where the muscle is not receiving clear nerve signals from the brain. It can present as either general muscle tightness that you can't relax or as spasmodic contractions (clonus)  It is a protective reflex but can result in damage to and shortening of the muscle and pain. It's usually tested for by doing a slow passive extension of the joint/muscle to find the possible range, followed by quick extension to feel for the "catch" point.  It you get the catch where the reflex triggers the muscle on then you have spacticity. It usually reduces as the nerve paths reroute and strengthen.

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DEIGH, What it is is uncontrolled muscular movements that look like random movements, which have no purpose other than to irritate their host, or the one who is having them. For instance, early in my recovery, whenever  I stood up my left leg would start shaking, like I was doing a bad Elvis imitation. The shaking was not caused by anything that I knowingly did, nor did it assist me in my goal of standing . My left hand will start shaking sometimes if I extend my left arm trying to reach something. These issues started about 6 mos. after my stroke, so about 13 yrs. ago. While I still have problems with spasticity and tone they are much improved as long as I remember to take my Baclofen.   Becky

 

 

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Thanks for those replies, I know the situation now and can recognise that one or two people I know have the problem. Fortunately not me!

Deigh

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