Gabapentin = how long before it works?


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Willis, also this is called emotional lability. The spelling is correct.  I find that if I research a stroke related issue, and choose a reputable site, I gain more knowledge about it. Many will tell you what treatments/meds used for it. You probably already know about research. 

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In America it's also called PBA (Pseudobulbar affect). It's very common with stroke damage.  it affects your ability to control emotional expression.  Most commonly the result is weeping, but it can also be laughter or swearing.  I take a low dose of lexapro for it

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 I know my friends there are a few different pills out there to treat these breakdowns. When I was given something for the 1st 6 months after my stroke in 2015 it honestly served it's purpose but I couldn't wait to stop taking it. I think it was for depression but forget it's name. Heathber  you said it so well. It's weeping and not full out crying. I reeled in the meanness issue on my own. April assured me I haven't been like that in a long time now. My project now is reeling in that weeping and I'm getting better everyday at it. I really don't want to take anymore pharmaceuticals because of all the side effects it has on me known and unknown. If I stay on schedule with my natural medicine it becomes much easier. I feel I got this! 

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Go for it Will, I know Deigh has pretty much got it under control without using meds. I chose the meds path knowing that it would be long term and not super happy about it. But I needed a quick fix at the time. My plan is to wean off them once I retire and don't have to appear professional 5 days a week.  I've had a foretaste of what it will be like as I was put on another med at one point that interfered with the absorption of the lexapro and it was not fun, until I worked out what was happening and was able to readjust schedules/doses.

 

What I find helpful is knowing that the problem is in the executive control function which is a learned process that most of us master as toddlers. So this is no different to learning to walk and run again. So expect to fall occasionally and be prepared to pick yourself up and start again until the skill is reestablished.

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1 hour ago, heathber said:

Go for it Will, I know Deigh has pretty much got it under control without using meds. I chose the meds path knowing that it would be long term and not super happy about it. But I needed a quick fix at the time. My plan is to wean off them once I retire and don't have to appear professional 5 days a week.  I've had a foretaste of what it will be like as I was put on another med at one point that interfered with the absorption of the lexapro and it was not fun, until I worked out what was happening and was able to readjust schedules/doses.

 

What I find helpful is knowing that the problem is in the executive control function which is a learned process that most of us master as toddlers. So this is no different to learning to walk and run again. So expect to fall occasionally and be prepared to pick yourself up and start again until the skill is reestablished.

Your information is priceless! Thank you for that. It sure makes sense to me.

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18 hours ago, heathber said:

Go for it Will, I know Deigh has pretty much got it under control without using meds.

 

Under control? yes, but only just, and I have to take great care to avoid situations when it is under pressure. I must admit that this has become easier with time.

Deigh

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3 hours ago, Deigh said:

 

Under control? yes, but only just, and I have to take great care to avoid situations when it is under pressure. I must admit that this has become easier with time.

Deigh

Yes Deigh with time here too but it will never be easy of course. The meanness I seem to recognize when it starts to creep in and have been able now to nip that in the bud. The weeping part is a real struggle at certain times but I'm getting a bit. better. at doing that privately. Using that phrase "I've got this" isn't the total truth. More like a vote of confidence and push for me. 

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Heather it can't be easy for you needing to be professional 5 days a week still along with all the other battles we face. Kudos to you!. Is there a light at the. end of the tunnel with work?

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Grief is natural after a stroke. It is the biggest loss ever...no matter what degree of change or damage....add the fact that the brain is supercharged for pain or emotional control and face it what is more irritation and frustration than dealing with the medical community...from Dr offices to insurance. I remember my first appointment after hospital. My kids looked in shocked disbelief as I sobbed at the front desk because I was there at wrong time. I mean I sobbed like my cat ran away. Totally disproportionate. I Never cried in public!! AND FOR THAT? I would have gone for lunch. I would have b e been flexible and reason able. I felt my mind and soul were foreign as my body.

 

I took something for depression that also worked on nerve pain. It didn't work for me. I felt weirder and still hurt physically. It was trial by fire to be sure. I agree time helped  but on occasion when I am ill or tired. Was it menopausal?? All emotions were heightened. Honestly I still am raw sometimes.++

 

I say hey just deal with me. This is me. If they are not compassionate then I say it is on them. ?

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4 hours ago, SassyBetsy said:

Grief is natural after a stroke. It is the biggest loss ever...no matter what degree of change or damage....add the fact that the brain is supercharged for pain or emotional control and face it what is more irritation and frustration than dealing with the medical community...from Dr offices to insurance. I remember my first appointment after hospital. My kids looked in shocked disbelief as I sobbed at the front desk because I was there at wrong time. I mean I sobbed like my cat ran away. Totally disproportionate. I Never cried in public!! AND FOR THAT? I would have gone for lunch. I would have b e been flexible and reason able. I felt my mind and soul were foreign as my body.

 

I took something for depression that also worked on nerve pain. It didn't work for me. I felt weirder and still hurt physically. It was trial by fire to be sure. I agree time helped  but on occasion when I am ill or tired. Was it menopausal?? All emotions were heightened. Honestly I still am raw sometimes.++

 

I say hey just deal with me. This is me. If they are not compassionate then I say it is on them. ?

Yep I felt raw all of a sudden a little bit ago. I'm over it.

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6 hours ago, Willis said:

Heather it can't be easy for you needing to be professional 5 days a week still along with all the other battles we face. Kudos to you!. Is there a light at the. end of the tunnel with work?

I'm not in a position where I can retire yet, the first couple of years post stroke wiped out my savings, just as well my super is/was preserved and Is still intact. I now get NDIS funding for therapy and basic supports which means I'm no longer going backwards financially, but reality is I'm not going to be able to retire early as I had once hoped to do.

I'm 9 years off standard retirement age.

On the bright side I currently have a very helpful and accommodating employer, so working is not as much of a burden as it might be.

 

Pam I so get that breakdown at the front desk. That was me before I started on the meds, the tiniest things could upset my equilibrium and once I started to cry I just couldn't stop. And the more people were sympathetic and tried to comfort me the worse it would get. You know you're overreacting but you just can't do anything and sympathy adds to the emotional overload you are already dealing with.

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15 hours ago, heathber said:

I'm not in a position where I can retire yet, the first couple of years post stroke wiped out my savings, just as well my super is/was preserved and Is still intact. I now get NDIS funding for therapy and basic supports which means I'm no longer going backwards financially, but reality is I'm not going to be able to retire early as I had once hoped to do.

I'm 9 years off standard retirement age.

On the bright side I currently have a very helpful and accommodating employer, so working is not as much of a burden as it might be.

 

Pam I so get that breakdown at the front desk. That was me before I started on the meds, the tiniest things could upset my equilibrium and once I started to cry I just couldn't stop. And the more people were sympathetic and tried to comfort me the worse it would get. You know you're overreacting but you just can't do anything and sympathy adds to the emotional overload you are already dealing with.

These are the stories Heather that make me wish we were all just down the hall or down the road from each other and not oceans apart like so many of us. Naturally, I Suppose no one gets this like we all do. That is great to hear about your employer. If you can have that the next 9 years that would be great and make a big difference for you I know. This open discussion about our emotions has been so very good for me. I am comfortable enough in my manhood to admit to some weeping. Why not? Because men aren't suppose to cry? Bull! I'm a human being with feelings and have never seen any need to hide any emotion except maybe anger at. the appropriate times. 

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