Any Links on Pool Therapies?


Recommended Posts

I've  been trying to find links on pool therapies.  I google but it becoming so advertiser based was just wondering if any members have easy non swim type therapy routines.  I am also trying to figure out who gave me advice to practise falling in the pool.  That advise has been so helpful.  At first I questioned the procedure.  Now I understand and am a lot more comfortable in the water.   If it was you please say hi.  If you know of who might of gave the suggestion I'd appreciate knowing whom it was and to acknowledge their suggestion.  Thank in advance for either the links or directing me to who aided me.

 

  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark, it may well have been me who suggested it, although I don't remember saying it. I'm addicted to pool therapy. One of the hardest things for me about the covid lockdowns here has been the closing of our pools. In my first 12 months after my stroke I had pool therapy at least twice a week, and it was the pool that got me back to using stairs, they used a weighted step that would sink to the bottom of the pool and be stable for practicing step ups and step downs, I did a lot of falling off that step 🙂

 

my pool routines now are basically the same as land based therapy routines. walk forwards, walk backwards, walk sideways, high knee jog, heel/toe walking. use a pool noodle under your arms for balance if needed.  lie in your noodle or in a corner of the pool and do bicycle legs (I also do frog kicks on my back this way, which are really hard). Put the noodle under your foot and push it to the bottom of the pool and then lift it up again (aim is slow and controlled movement), hold the top ends of the noodle with your hands if you can,use the side of the pool for balance if you really need to.  2 hands on the noodle and glide it across the water surface, in/out and left/right (aim is to get full range of shoulder movement.) also push the noodle down your body into the water and control it back up.

 

Get creative, any water aerobics movement can be used. If your non therapy pools are open take a couple of water aerobics classes to get some ideas. Remember water offers both support and resistance, use that fact.

 

my pool tools are the noodle, a kick board and a pull buoy, but you can also use water dumbbells, and/or hand fins.  I do some swim training as well as the other therapy routines, getting your flutter kick going again on both legs is not easy, I still go round in circles unless I concentrate very hard.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark I'm so glad you've taken the plunge!! 🤣🤣

All the best as you immerse yourself in pool stuff!

Coming into Autumn and winter there, will you continue during those colder months?

 

💚👑

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, heathber said:

Hi Mark, it may well have been me who suggested it, although I don't remember saying it. I'm addicted to pool therapy. One of the hardest things for me about the covid lockdowns here has been the closing of our pools. In my first 12 months after my stroke I had pool therapy at least twice a week, and it was the pool that got me back to using stairs, they used a weighted step that would sink to the bottom of the pool and be stable for practicing step ups and step downs, I did a lot of falling off that step 🙂

 

my pool routines now are basically the same as land based therapy routines. walk forwards, walk backwards, walk sideways, high knee jog, heel/toe walking. use a pool noodle under your arms for balance if needed.  lie in your noodle or in a corner of the pool and do bicycle legs (I also do frog kicks on my back this way, which are really hard). Put the noodle under your foot and push it to the bottom of the pool and then lift it up again (aim is slow and controlled movement), hold the top ends of the noodle with your hands if you can,use the side of the pool for balance if you really need to.  2 hands on the noodle and glide it across the water surface, in/out and left/right (aim is to get full range of shoulder movement.) also push the noodle down your body into the water and control it back up.

 

Get creative, any water aerobics movement can be used. If your non therapy pools are open take a couple of water aerobics classes to get some ideas. Remember water offers both support and resistance, use that fact.

 

my pool tools are the noodle, a kick board and a pull buoy, but you can also use water dumbbells, and/or hand fins.  I do some swim training as well as the other therapy routines, getting your flutter kick going again on both legs is not easy, I still go round in circles unless I concentrate very hard.

 

 

 

Thank you Heathber.  That advise likely saved me.  I started getting nervy trying out different move while holding a noodle.  Needless to say I went into a cramp and lost grip on the noodle.  Doing those falls made it less of a stressful for me.  Have your head go underwater is  a whole different issue for my type of stroke.  Brain Stem constantly fight or forcing my right side to do what it should normally do.  Always hanging on to pool noodle.  I seem to cramp as the weightless feeling is difficult for my brain to figure out.  My so called gerbil on the right side really start moving up and down my right side.  More repetitions I do the faster they get till I cramp.  

 

The first time I tried an experiment fall would of caused a lifeguard a heart attack.  Falling wasn't the hard part it was how my right side reacted.  It gets really confused.  As it feel like it is floating yet its not I have to think hard between the two sides.  Se now every time I get in the water I sort of fall forward letting my head go underneath.  I panic briefly now and getting more relaxed at head going underwater without gasping for air.  It was a very smart suggestion and I thank you so much for something that sounded stupid at first.  

 

Pool noodle squats  are about all I can remember to do.  Walk in circles and backward walk.  Side steps.  One legged hops feel safer doing them in the water instead of out of the water.

 

Fall won't be a problem as we have it heated.  Winter will likely go back to stroke club routine if they start up again.  I've had to slow down to every other day.  Missing days also.  More for the cramping mode.

 

All those tips are great and going to print them off.  Set them to music I like and get creative then.  One I created was the embryo move. 
Since right side always want to bunch up using the noodle I turn into a embryo and hold whilst float with noodle.  

 

water dumb bells I may purchase. Kick board.  Your advise was great and a sincere thankyou 

 

Mark

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, GreenQueen said:

Mark I'm so glad you've taken the plunge!! 🤣🤣

All the best as you immerse yourself in pool stuff!

Coming into Autumn and winter there, will you continue during those colder months?

 

💚👑

My pool is not very deep 4 foot and it has steps which made entry a whole lot easier and accessible for getting in and getting out of the pool.

Have a pool heater. Not sure how expensive it will get if we run it in the colder temperatures.  Likely go back to club if they resume the pool program.  Thanks for the support Green Queen.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark, I can't really hold the noodle with my left hand so we usually tuck it under my armpits rather than relying on my grip. That way it acts as a safety vest if needed. It's not enough to pull my head out of water like a life jacket would but it helps enough that I can recover myself when needed.  "My" pool is about 5ft deep, and only heated to about 21C so you have to keep moving or you will get cold.  I was on the committee that organised out pool refurb. a couple of year ago and I won the campaign to add steps. before that we only had ladders and I could do those at the start of a session but not really at the end, was reliant on having someone to help me out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can grip its the spasticity that lets go of the noodle.  I use a giant noodle we found at Costco.  Wrap it under arms. 

We had a ladder pool but it was a battle and I gave up. 

 
large.PXL_20210706_002819872_PANO.jpg.514ed9db8df65d287dd986f31f434f08.jpg I could never manage getting in.  We stumbled across this steel walled pool.  Pre Covid.  Thought this would be better for me.  

Can see the rail and steps and the pool noodles I use.  

 

We are very happy except for the cost of lumber rise during covid.  Its back down.  

 

Had another panic moment yesterday when the noodle came out from under my arm.  

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark you aren't out at the pool, which looks amazing by the way, on your own?

 

I know it's not really deep, but falling and getting back up is not always easy!

 

Spasticity due to cold weather and heating costs may have you finding an indoor activity for winter.

 

💚👑

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since we've basically no problems with ambient temps year round here in South Florida the pool is comfortable for relaxing 24/7. Sometimes even edging close to luke-warm in summers. Growing up here in Miami pools have been a mainstay, a necessary luxury, and a much needed stress reliever throughout the years. Since moving to this home pre-stroke I never realized how differently the pool environment would change post-stroke. One of the biggest differences noticed were entering the pool and how odd the sensations of the numb side of my body felt all the way to the up to the top of  my head felt, that really wakes up the senses! Following surgery/stroke my body was much stronger and it was a joy to use the pool. I would race around the perimeter in the pool backwards until I actually got an active current flow in the direction I was moving and then change my body movement direction facing the current and race forwards against it just propelling with my legs. This provided me with a good workout all the while spending time cleaning the tiles or brushing. I've no rail at my steps so I placed a pool deck chair next to the steps for stability especially when exiting the pool as the weight differential shifting on my body it felt much safer. All the weight of gravity plus a fatigued body placed on the body is taxing. And of course being a long time martial artist it was a given that all forms and techniques could be applied in the water with ease and if my balance got the better of me, off balance falling in the water wasn't a problem whatsoever, actually it was quite welcomed and easily recovered. Easily I could spend a few hours in the water just relaxing, getting some sun, or exercising.

 

However, with that said, since post stroke several years now, naturally aging and deficits, pool maintenance along with lawn care have gone the way of the dinosaur. I had to aid my pool maintenance by adding an automatic pool vacuum that cleans the pool daily but makes my movements around the pool more restrictive also. Additionally, I don't use the pool as much now as I did just after stroking. It is a plus still to have it to escape from gravity though. A much needed relaxer still. Pool therapy is such a comfort, having the feeling of water surrounding the body is a much needed source as a stress reliever.

 

 

My assistant...

 

p1904635435-3.jpg 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, GreenQueen said:

Mark you aren't out at the pool, which looks amazing by the way, on your own?

 

I know it's not really deep, but falling and getting back up is not always easy!

 

Spasticity due to cold weather and heating costs may have you finding an indoor activity for winter.

 

💚👑

I have to wait till someone is home.  Thinking of lifevest 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Madade said:

I have to wait till someone is home.  Thinking of lifevest 

 

Good idea.

💚👑

Link to post
Share on other sites

. I've no rail at my steps so I placed a pool deck chair next to the steps for stability especially when exiting the pool

 

 

Will...not sure if you should tell your physio about this or not!!

 

To me, it's the perfect solution, but those with a degree can see all the hazards involved with our ingenuity!!

 

💚👑

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, will2 said:

Since we've basically no problems with ambient temps year round here in South Florida the pool is comfortable for relaxing 24/7. Sometimes even edging close to luke-warm in summers. Growing up here in Miami pools have been a mainstay, a necessary luxury, and a much needed stress reliever throughout the years. Since moving to this home pre-stroke I never realized how differently the pool environment would change post-stroke. One of the biggest differences noticed were entering the pool and how odd the sensations of the numb side of my body felt all the way to the up to the top of  my head felt, that really wakes up the senses! Following surgery/stroke my body was much stronger and it was a joy to use the pool. I would race around the perimeter in the pool backwards until I actually got an active current flow in the direction I was moving and then change my body movement direction facing the current and race forwards against it just propelling with my legs. This provided me with a good workout all the while spending time cleaning the tiles or brushing. I've no rail at my steps so I placed a pool deck chair next to the steps for stability especially when exiting the pool as the weight differential shifting on my body it felt much safer. All the weight of gravity plus a fatigued body placed on the body is taxing. And of course being a long time martial artist it was a given that all forms and techniques could be applied in the water with ease and if my balance got the better of me, off balance falling in the water wasn't a problem whatsoever, actually it was quite welcomed and easily recovered. Easily I could spend a few hours in the water just relaxing, getting some sun, or exercising.

 

However, with that said, since post stroke several years now, naturally aging and deficits, pool maintenance along with lawn care have gone the way of the dinosaur. I had to aid my pool maintenance by adding an automatic pool vacuum that cleans the pool daily but makes my movements around the pool more restrictive also. Additionally, I don't use the pool as much now as I did just after stroking. It is a plus still to have it to escape from gravity though. A much needed relaxer still. Pool therapy is such a comfort, having the feeling of water surrounding the body is a much needed source as a stress reliever.

 

 

My assistant...

 

p1904635435-3.jpg 

 

 

Been to Florida several times and always had access to a pool.  Went to Treasure Island one year and used an sling hoist into the pool.  That was very neat and easy.  Made wear a life vest also.  

 

Our pool (new) was selected for me.  It had to have stairs or ramp and a railing system to allow me to get in.  We met this couple who had this partial in ground and they sold the pool just got into it.  The staircase was the biggest selection width and step choice. then they offered two or single rails.   The recommended the materials due to cost and watching me get in their pool.  We were going to go with all in ground but  she advised against it due to living in the country and wild life access.   Snakes racoons particularly.  The deck at the time was going to bit a little extra cost but they felt we would be happier.  

 

We got the kit delivered but some of the material got back ordered.  Covid was the excuse.  We had the installer go with 1 foot above grade.  The seller though should go higher and we looked and agreed.  So filled it in to raise it further.  Being done in the fall we skipped the liner and filling it till spring.   If we only knew lumber was going to go through the roof over winter.  Winter allowed the dig it breakdown and settle nice.   Got a sand base in and the liner.  The pump, filter, and heater.  I was of no help.  Too much mental thinking.  

 

Niece and her husband did most of the work.  Great ideas with thoughts and what to do for decking.  I basically fell into a slump as was being asked what I thought.  Too often I said just need steps to get in.  I don't care come up often.  

 

Then after pool was filled and running we scrambled to purchase lumber before shortage and then had to store it in our shed till deck contractor finalized the design and what wife wanted.  The price almost tripled.   Was surprised at the number of contractors willing to do the deck as the shortage of lumber spurred on layoff in the construction field.  All said I'm quite surprised at how it all turned out.  Looks better than I imagined.  Key to me easy to get in and out.  At first I wish we went 6' deep but after cramping in it glad it is only 4 feet in depth.  The size is 24 foot diameter.  Also large but the other 3 love that part for room and swimming ability for them.  

 

I notice the feeling of float on the right side.  Most often I want to roll to the right side.  Still cramping but its coming around.  More time in the pool it will get better.  Might be able to use right up to November with the heater and climate change.

 

I am  very impressed with how it all turned out.  

 

 

Also Will how did you post that photo of your assistant?  Copy paste?  Or select other media at the bottom here.  

 

I fight constantly with photos on this site.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that was easy.  Thanks Will for your post.  Now I learnt something on here.  

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Madade said:

Well that was easy.  Thanks Will for your post.  Now I learnt something on here.  

 

 

Your welcome, and I just saw your post and was ready to reply with some instructions. I've been posting images on several sites for many years. Post-stroke I did a lot of dslr photography and joined my online photo hosting site Zenfolio, and just upload all my photos to my host and copy the URL's and just paste in the media URL tab. Easy peasy. Glad you got it. BTW Madade, beautiful pool and decking. I almost went with similar type decorative wood decking but after several years of taking care of my front yard decking/benches, I eventually felt it wasn't worth the upkeep with all the high humidity and tropical rains we get here along the SE coast. Though it was built with very sturdy pressure treated lumber, and periodically pressure cleaned and coated with a wood treatment, the mold eventually gets the best of the woods..I'm talking after a few decades. I love the look of woods. I gave in with the front decking and replaced it with artistic stamped concrete throughout the front and entrance sidewalk/driveway. Much easier upkeep. On the pool deck I just have it pressure cleaned once in awhile to keep it looking good. I'm currently due in the next few weeks for having it done again. It's hard to prevent the mold from the high humidity, rain, and higher temps each year here. Less humidity would be the trick, but the moisture sits on the keystone and absorbs and mold is just naturally going to grow, and quickly. 

 

Nonetheless, the deck architecture is just beautiful around your pool. :2thumbs:

 

Janelle, your right. Getting out of the pool using the deck chair isn't at all the best solution. The only other way I've managed was to scoot up the steps backwards on my bum until I reach top pool coping and swivel around. The feeling of exiting the pool hits you with all the gravity on the body, almost feels like lead weight right when you really need good stability to stand up. 

 

Thinking about the pool, when I first moved here in 92' I would put a chair in the deep end and put my scuba gear on and just sit there. Unbelievably peaceful and relaxing baring the tank and bubbles:tongue:

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Madade said:

 


 I was of no help.  Too much mental thinking.  

 

Niece and her husband did most of the work.  Great ideas with thoughts and what to do for decking.  I basically fell into a slump as was being asked what I thought.  Too often I said just need steps to get in.  I don't care come up often.  

 

Mark, three words:

 

This. Is. Normal.

 

 

Please, don't feel bad AT ALL. This sounds exactly like what I would do/say.

 

Even little things (to others) just make the brain want to runaway.

 

We got you.

 

💚👑😘

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, will2 said:

 

 

Janelle, your right. Getting out of the pool using the deck chair isn't at all the best solution. The only other way I've managed was to scoot up the steps backwards on my bum until I reach top pool coping and swivel around. The feeling of exiting the pool hits you with all the gravity on the body, almost feels like lead weight right when you really need good stability to stand up. 

 

Thinking about the pool, when I first moved here in 92' I would put a chair in the deep end and put my scuba gear on and just sit there. Unbelievably peaceful and relaxing baring the tank and bubbles:tongue:

Totally!! Never had a pool, but had a spa for a few years.

 

I would be in the spa two or three times a day, for at least an hour at a time. A real time waster!

 

I miss having a spa, but not the struggles getting in and out.  Or trying to organise people to help me.

 

💚👑😘

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is a jacuzzi the same thing as a spa?  Bubbling waters was at the stroke clubs pool really like it.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the bubbling waters are great.

My mum used to try to get me to go to the local hydro pool, but we weighed everything up.

 

I would have get organised and get to the pool, spend money getting in, spend time in the pool, get changed in a changeroom with a wet floor and get home again.

 

We decided the fatigue factor, the time factor and cost for benefit factor, it would be worthwhile investing in a spa.

 

We got the floor model as the owner of the shop knocked $2000 off the price.

 

It was good while it lasted.

 

When we sold it recently, we bought a new lounge with electric recliners.

 

Win win.

 

💚👑

Link to post
Share on other sites

Our handicapped daughter really enjoys them (spa).  The few I've been in are really soothing on the right side.  A lot of design critiquing will have to take place.  Similar to pool step down into it be ideal.  Haven't seen on with that design.    Grab rails may have to be designed.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Yes the spa isn't really disability friendly. 

 

You can buy a s

 spa for disabled people, where you open a door and sit down. Push a button and water fills the space then I think you might move to the next section and do the same, then reverse it all to get out. A cool $20k. Australian. Waaay over our paygrade, and too much messing around for my impatient self.

 

https://www.leisurescapespas.com.au/product/leisurescape-disabled-or-senior-walkin-spa-1

Link to post
Share on other sites

steps down into the spa certainly help. The best ones I've seen are on the cruise ships. Steps up from the deck with a rail and then steps down into the water with another rail. I don't know why these aren't standard on land as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.