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Does anyone ever recover?


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26 replies to this topic

#1 khiggs

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 02:51 PM

Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.

#2 mcdube

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 05:12 PM

Hi, I only met one person who could use her affected hand but she had to look at her hand when using it because it remained numb. For example if she had a dime, a quarter and a nickel in her pocket she couldn`t grab the quarter, she would get a coin but she had to look to see which one she had so she has lost feeling in that hand even if she can use it. Don`t despair I do believe with work we will get to that point as recovery never ends. Good luck to you.

mc


#3 fking

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 07:15 PM

In my 7 years of recovery and having therapy at several places on an out patient bases I haven't spoken to anyone who could use the affected hand. I think once it's paralysed we just can't use it like we wish we could. I suppose unless we get that area of the brain repaired it's next to never going to work as before the stroke.

We will be able to open/close it but not much control for fine motor skills. The cells to that part of the brain are dead so no control is my guess. My doctor said long ago if no other cells or blood supply takes over that function we probably won't get control of that hand. Also in most strokes those cells are the first to die from lack of blood flow.

I think that's probably right since your hand is the first sign you know something is wrong then your elbow. Well, that is what happen in my case with a brain bleed. Now I do think therapy and exercise will prevent the hand from closing up completely and the arm from drawing up too!

#4 AmbassadorLenny

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 08:20 PM

hi Kiggs, i know that my physiotherapist tells me that it is always the last to come because of the fine motor skills that is needed to manipulate your fingers as the muscles is so many i personally know of one guy who had a stroke and he can walk with a cane but he can also pick up a dime with his affected hand and i can tell you this much about the hand i don"t have much use of my fingers but i have come a long way it just takes time and work and you must remember that your leg muscle is very large muscle compared to your arm and the leg is weight bearing all the time so it definitely makes sense to me that the leg will come first before the arm and fingers , so just be patient and don"t give up hope.

#5 Ethyl17

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 08:22 PM

Don't lose hope! You are just a bit discouraged right now, all that work and no results. I remember when the Neuro told us at the hospital that Bruce may not get his arm-hand back, only time and exercise would tell. One of Bruce's friends who I don't care for and she certainly doesn't care for me, brings that up every once in a while. Just makes me more determined to help him.

I know of three: A young stroke-he was 26-10 years into recovery he is now a nurse. Our little Rob, who is 5 years younger than Bruce when he stroked, now finally has his hand back. But if you read any of my posts, this kid works on his arm two hours at Rehab every single day, at home on the weekends. He is 4 years into recovery. And one woman, who is Bruce's age, but she has to use the Saebo flex.

Bruce Estims the shoulder twice every day without fail and now with the Baclofen increase, the arm and hand are looser. He "feels" them and works the arm and hand almost all the time except when he is reading. He has a bit back in the arm: forward and backward motion. But his fingers are open (that is the splint overnight, the Baclofen and Bruce's massaging). So we shall see. Just keep at it. I remember the feeling when Bruce moved his arm in anticipation of holding my hand. To me something is still connected or reconnecting, if he thought he could do that. Best, Debbie

#6 dreinke

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 08:55 PM

Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.

This is why all stroke survivors need to demand a damage diagnosis, what was damaged and in the penumbra or brain bleed area - this can usually come back with lots of hard work. Then we need to know what areas are dead and what they controlled, this is really problematic to get back, my theory would be that you would need either neurogenesis or stems cells to populate that area the get some function back, or you use hard neuroplasticity to take over existing functionality and replace it with your wanted functions. Hopefully you don't have your executive functions taken over by motor control. When this finally occurs your doctors will be able to look at case studies and give some semblence of what might happen. Never mind me, I am not medically trained and should never question the medical deities.
Dean :yadayada: :roflmao:

#7 Farrell

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:49 AM

At age 45 I had a an AVM rupture. (was diagnosed 10 yrs. prior) Was too deep to do surgery.
(Had to have children C-section due to pressure on the brain.) But when it did bleed paralized
entire right side. Ended up in nursing home unable to walk, speak, move, eat ect. Diabled children
were on 2nd floor so 2 physical therapist were there during week to work w/ patients. So they got
me started on a standing table. Had therapy 2 days a week. My insurance had speech therapist come
into work w/ me to get me to say sounds w/ swallowing liquids(was on feeding tube) Long haul & alot
of hard work forged on till I got strong enough to have surgery to remove AVM. Had the best surgeon
who pionered embolization before removing avm. Made it thru surgery went back to nursing home to get
strong enough to go into in-patient rehab. It was at that time started to get feeling back in a right
finger. Therapists had me where a brace that stretched my hand out all day in a positon of open hand.
Kept up stretching my ft. to a 90 degree angle ect. Over time started to speak one word at a time.
S-l-o-w process, over months of therapy.... Repetition of moving all parts of body for me trying to
have brain that was healthy connect to do that which right side could not. Removed feeding tube.

Moved me to a rehab center as an in-patient staffed in the day w/ therapists that worked w/ stroke
victims & brain injury patients. (had a pool) Worked all day learning to get dressed in a wheelchair,
learning to write all over again, to walk, eat, speak. AVM was in exectuive part of brain. over months
& months of got feeling back in right side except lower leg is still partially paralized. Wear a brace
& stretch everyday. Can walk w/ cane. & drive in small town w/ left ft. gas pedal. After in-patient got
a ride for 2 years to hospital for out-patient work. thankfully we had insurance to cover all this! :happydance: God is
good! I continue to do exercising, stretching & pool after some 15 years past stroke. So my answer to your
question is yes I believe if you get the right therapy one can do wonders & w/ the grace of God anything is
possible!
Take care my friend & all the best to you!

#8 CagedBird

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 04:38 PM

Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.


My experience is opposite. Every survivor I ever met got the FULL use back in their hand even the ones I watched in occupational therapy use their hand to do things like pick up pegs from a table with little to no struggle at all. I on the other hand am 11 years post stroke and can not even open my hand but I can use it if I tried more. Your question is does anyone get the use of their hand back right? Well yes we can all use our affected hand for something. With a fist I can hit the light switch and when I pry open my fingers I can hold stuff in my hand (though not for long). My hand has been one of the hardest things for me to deal with after the stroke. Like you, I quit focusing on the big stuff and just hope and wish for the ability to simply open and close my hand. However, I think you should stop focusing so much on getting your hand back to "normal" and just figure out what you can do using your hand the way it is. I admit I have to practice what I preach. I usually do everything with my good hand because its quicker and easier to not bother trying to incorporate my weak hand. but I will say when you figure out what you can do with your weak hand, it is a great feeling! So figure out what you can do and maybe the more your practice it, the more your brain will remember how to use that hand again.

#9 Pwilson18

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 09:50 PM

HI IM OVER 3 1/2 YEARS POST BRAINSTEM STROKE ON MY R SIDE. I LOST 1/2 OF MY USAGE WITH MY R HAND AND ARM BUT I STILL TRY TO USE IT WHEN I CAN OR DEPENDING ON WHAT I DO OR WHAT THE SITUATION IS!!I VE OFTEN WONDERED THE SAME THOUGHT AS YOU HAVE BEST WISHES. PATTY

#10 Sharlord

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 05:57 AM

What helped me was my OT made a hand paddle for me. He cut out foamed poster board from like staples office supply in the shape for my hand then put two of them together for thickness and strength. He covered the whole thing with duct tape. Then using paper medical tape we would get my fingers open and tape my open hand on to the paddle. At first I could only tolerate it for a short time. As time went on I was able to sleep with it on. After a while when I would untape my hand it would stay open and I was able to begin working on tasks. It is a slow process but it works. Still working on recovery, it's nice that my healing hand is cooperating with the work being put in. I an left handed and my stroke affected my left side. I can pick up and release now. I can hold my coffee cup by the handle and drink. write somewhat chickenscratch. type on the keyboard a little. its comming, it just takes a long long time. Don't give up

#11 HenryB

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 07:46 PM

Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.


Hi: I suggest you check out the website, recoverfromstroke.blogspot.com by Peter Levine. Go to Archives to find the entries for Feb. 4, 2011, and view the video by Kathy Spencer--the entry's title is "26 months" with comment by Levine. I was told by my therapist that I'd never get use of my arm and hand back. This video proves the therapist wrong! Henry

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 12:23 AM

/Hi Khiggs,

I am a total right side paralysis stroke survivor. I was told I had NO tone in my right arm and would never be able to use it again. That was almost two years ago. Today I have full range of motion although it is still difficult and takes a lot of concentration and effort. My hand is also fully functional though much weaker than my left.

I am absolutely not saying 'if I can do it anyone can' nor am I saying I am some wonderwoman but it happened.

Please don't get down on yourself and celebrate every success no matter how large or small.

you simply have no idea how happy i was or how much I carried on when st the age of 47 I tied my shoes for the first time!

You will be in my thoughts.

#13 Sharlord

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 05:00 AM

here is great inspiration for you thanks to youtube and

#14 Glenn

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 12:13 PM

I am 3 years post stroke. I was to the VA recently for therapy. I was told that I would never get the use of my left hand back. Part of the reason they gave me was my age, I am 78 years old. It appears that younger people stand a better chance. So it might depend on your age. As for me I have found other ways to do things that my left hand used to do. I use spring clamps, magnets, and duck tape a lot to hold things. Best of luck in your efforts
Glenn

#15 ksmith

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 06:25 PM

now this is my opinion,



is anyone ever recover?

Your stroke is still a year + old. In stroke terms that's still young. The first year always is the hardest. This feeling you get is normal. A hard thing to do is learn patience. Over time, things can still get better but you cant keep on waiting for the old you to return. This is the 'new' you. Is it fair? No.. but if you wait and wait for change and change doesn't come you're only going to spiral faster.


Little things as you said like opening and closing your hand,have to come after a few things happen. Baby steps. Like 1. practice 2. practice..3. Practice.. I know these are things you've heard before but that's the way. I am practicing to see out of both of my eyes. I still have to wear prisms for my one eye turns in but with practice ( I've been in therapy for that over a year and a half) i can do that. But not now, But like with your hand, one day and if not... then as many others have done is to re learn doing things as the new you. Listen..One things Ive said before here is.. one way to stay positive is to read the other profiles and learn what other people have. Reflect on their short comings and you will see that all isn't that bad.

This my friend is but another road bump we face but if you and others have made the first year.. we've done half the battle

#16 thejule1

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 07:10 PM

here is great inspiration for you thanks to youtube and

Thanks Sharlord for sharing these. I had seen the video where the woman (Kathy) used the Bioness but not the one where she actually played the piano. That was awesome! She worked hard every day. The Bioness helped her and our OT is using it on Larry with some success now. It is an expensive piece of equipment and they only have 1 at the rehab center. I would be grateful if Larry just got back some movement in his arm and hand. I doubt if he would work as hard as she did. I can't instill the motivation in him. He has to do it.

Julie

#17 CagedBird

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 07:58 PM

Thank you HenryB for posting abut Kathy Spencer. I got in touch with her and she gave me some very valuable information. I am so thankful for StrokeNet!

#18 Little Jo

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 02:41 PM

I gotmy hands an legs to work again i was paralyzed in my hands an legs when i had my last stroke . An that was 2000-8 . It took a lot of work but i did it . So please don.t give up keep working on it . I had a Ischemic stroke But i did not give up i keep on working on it . :)

#19 leese

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 01:38 AM

I've seen a number of hand recoveries in rehab. I can't tell you the severity of the strokes they survived though. I'm 22 months post and have gotten to the point where my affected hand can be of some use with much effort. I'm not working on it right now very much beyond maintaining what I've gotten back so far. I'm too focused on other deficits at the moment.I don't have enough mental or physical energy for more than one obsession at a time and that's my mode of operation with my recovery. But, what I'm saying is... it's possible.
Keep at it.

#20 Suria

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 06:29 AM

YES, i have seen 2 others in therapy who have complete use of their affected hand back. one after 2 years and the other after 3. keep at it and good luck. don't let anyone tell you otherwise

#21 rbm

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 08:46 PM

I do think you recover but that bring up a question I had does it depend on how ago you had a stroke like mine was probably 12 hours before it was caught.

#22 mcdube

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 09:08 PM

Yes, I met at least 2 people who can use their affected hand. It does happen with a lot of work. Not everyone gets the use of their hand back. If you dont try to get it back you will never know if with work it would have come back. Work like you know it will come back, and maybe it will. In the meantime nothing wrong with learning to cope with one hand. All the best to you

mc

PS. Mine has not come back but I do great with only one.


#23 maree

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:59 PM

Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.


If you really are going to be just satisfied with being able to open and close your hand, and to, therefore be able to use it clumsily, then, yes, you can get that back, although I do say that from the position of having had my mother (who had a stroke about 20 years before me) having made it a mission of hers, whilst I was in a six week coma, to come into the hospital EVERY day (sometimes twice a day) to stretch and passively exercise my affected arm, hand and leg, AND to order the nurses around to not leave me lying with my arm bent at the elbow or my hand clenched. She would come into the hospital at any time of the day, and check me, and if I was not arranged as she had instructed, she would stride ferociously off to the nurse's station, and loudly harangue them. I, once had a vague memory of my lying in my bed and hearing raised voices in the hallway, which, a few months ago, I realise must have been my mother, laying down the law.
Anyway, that is beside the point. I spent a lot of my down time sitting down, in front of the TV, nothing else that I could do. And I would passively force my fingers open, both individually, and together and forward and back with my good hand - stretching them as far as I could. Eventually, one day, I had the excitement of being able to open and close the hand independently of my good hand. I can still do this, some 15 years post stroke, but, only if I have time, and I am not under pressure to perform. Responding to a sudden proffered handshake is far beyond my skills, and this has been very detrimental both in my quest to get a job, and socially. My affected hand never responds automatically to stimuli, every movement I make is one that I have considered, and told myself that I should make with that dud hand.
I do hear people who like to rah, rah and say how well they have recovered, but I do wonder how badly affected they were in the beginning

#24 linda6363

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 03:18 PM


Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.


If you really are going to be just satisfied with being able to open and close your hand, and to, therefore be able to use it clumsily, then, yes, you can get that back, although I do say that from the position of having had my mother (who had a stroke about 20 years before me) having made it a mission of hers, whilst I was in a six week coma, to come into the hospital EVERY day (sometimes twice a day) to stretch and passively exercise my affected arm, hand and leg, AND to order the nurses around to not leave me lying with my arm bent at the elbow or my hand clenched. She would come into the hospital at any time of the day, and check me, and if I was not arranged as she had instructed, she would stride ferociously off to the nurse's station, and loudly harangue them. I, once had a vague memory of my lying in my bed and hearing raised voices in the hallway, which, a few months ago, I realise must have been my mother, laying down the law.
Anyway, that is beside the point. I spent a lot of my down time sitting down, in front of the TV, nothing else that I could do. And I would passively force my fingers open, both individually, and together and forward and back with my good hand - stretching them as far as I could. Eventually, one day, I had the excitement of being able to open and close the hand independently of my good hand. I can still do this, some 15 years post stroke, but, only if I have time, and I am not under pressure to perform. Responding to a sudden proffered handshake is far beyond my skills, and this has been very detrimental both in my quest to get a job, and socially. My affected hand never responds automatically to stimuli, every movement I make is one that I have considered, and told myself that I should make with that dud hand.
I do hear people who like to rah, rah and say how well they have recovered, but I do wonder how badly affected they were in the beginning



#25 linda6363

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 03:20 PM


Does anyone with total paralysis on one side ever manage to get the use of their hand baCK? I get so discouraged at times and wonder. I hear so many stories of people struggling and don't hear anyone saying they got use of their hand back. I know it's slow and takes time, just wondering if it's possible at all. I haven't even ever met someone at therapy who could say they have use of their hand. At this point I don't even care about the really hard stuff, I just want to open and close my hand. I'm doing it all...botox,saeboflex & stretch, pushups, estim. You name it.


If you really are going to be just satisfied with being able to open and close your hand, and to, therefore be able to use it clumsily, then, yes, you can get that back, although I do say that from the position of having had my mother (who had a stroke about 20 years before me) having made it a mission of hers, whilst I was in a six week coma, to come into the hospital EVERY day (sometimes twice a day) to stretch and passively exercise my affected arm, hand and leg, AND to order the nurses around to not leave me lying with my arm bent at the elbow or my hand clenched. She would come into the hospital at any time of the day, and check me, and if I was not arranged as she had instructed, she would stride ferociously off to the nurse's station, and loudly harangue them. I, once had a vague memory of my lying in my bed and hearing raised voices in the hallway, which, a few months ago, I realise must have been my mother, laying down the law.
Anyway, that is beside the point. I spent a lot of my down time sitting down, in front of the TV, nothing else that I could do. And I would passively force my fingers open, both individually, and together and forward and back with my good hand - stretching them as far as I could. Eventually, one day, I had the excitement of being able to open and close the hand independently of my good hand. I can still do this, some 15 years post stroke, but, only if I have time, and I am not under pressure to perform. Responding to a sudden proffered handshake is far beyond my skills, and this has been very detrimental both in my quest to get a job, and socially. My affected hand never responds automatically to stimuli, every movement I make is one that I have considered, and told myself that I should make with that dud hand.
I do hear people who like to rah, rah and say how well they have recovered, but I do wonder how badly affected they were in the beginning






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