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Being a cargiver is rough....


ruthpill

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I was out and about yesterday. I had gotten home from work and decided that William needed to get out of the house. I asked him where he wanted to go for lunch. We decided on one place and then by the time we got there decded on another. This one has free icecream and all that you want to drink ice tea and lemonade. The lemonade machine was broken. As usual we ordered way too much food. We had salad, soup and a sandwich. Just one of each. We had to bring the entire sandwich home. Just shows you how large everything was. Wm had the soup and i had the salad. What if I had gotten two of everything????

 

Next we stopped at the grocery store to pick up some eggs. William loves to have his caregiver make him breakfast of eggs and bacon and toast. We had run out of eggs. I stopped and spoke to our friend in the store. He told me that the caregiver is the roughest job. I had to agree with him. Today, when I got back from my swim...William was on the phone with our pastor. She is the one that visited him in the hospital alot. She is a dear. She was telling me that it is too bad that the church cannot provide more services to caregivers but they just don't have the volunteers.

 

I told her that people are just not aware of the need. I wasn't when William was healthy. But, with the greying of america we will soon have a crisis on our hands. Alot of other folks are going to need this type of help. Yes , It is a tsunami that is approaching us as she put it. What are we to do. We here at strokeboard are coping and getting what support we can. But, it is a hard and long journey for us.

 

As she put it ...hopefully we will get more stuff in place when the tsunami hits.

 

I hope so.

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Ruth, another blog..hey ho two in a row!

 

You and William do well, I like your common sense approach. It is good you can see the significance of the small things like William now being able to make his own choices. That means you are able to back away from that and let it happen.

 

Your pastor is right, not only is the western world greying but as the congregational average age goes up we are able to provide less and less services. Our church has a few nice ladies who do a pastoral phone calls and hospital and nursing home visits but no longer people who grannysit or provide meals or any practical help. I as one of them am now occupied with my own personal caring role.

 

She is maybe wrong about the tsunami hitting making a difference, the best crisis management is preparedness so we better educate the young to help the old now or many will not see the need to help or have the necessary skills to do so.

 

Sue.

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Ruth: my work is in the middle of a crisis as probably so is yours. October 1, 2011 Medicare and Medicaid will cut reimbursement to SNFs by 10-12%. Guidelines came out two weeks ago-300 pages that Administration is still trying to get through. But right off the top, ours is figuring 10% and the layoffs are already happening. A lot of out-sourcing, so people who have been with us 30 years are now out of a job.

 

Numbers of the family caregivers in the state came out about a month ago. Wish I had cut it out and saved it. Saving Connecticut close to 7 million dollars every year. What happens when the caregivers can no longer do the job remains to be seen.

 

Bruce and I were off on errands today. We had a long list and it was funny, about 11 am he says to me where would your friend Ruth take William to eat at this time? I almost drove off the rode. He knows all of you through me. Does not read the board. I think he relates to William because their ages and strokes are about the same time. Lunch out was not an option unfortunately. His Doctor is insisting on an afternoon nap=a true nap, not down time in bed surfing channels. This requires an Ultram with his Baclofen but he does get an hour solid. We are only in week one, so do not want to waver from the schedule plus that gives me time to prep for dinner, night, next morning and my work. Personally, the extra Ultram is making him sluggish, but I also know that spine hurts after all day in a WC. Leo does report he upped his exercises before bed and Bruce seems to be in less pain and willing to do more. Always a dilemma-nothing is ever cut and dried in this stroke recovery business. Good week, Debbie

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Ruth, another blog..hey ho two in a row!

 

You and William do well, I like your common sense approach. It is good you can see the significance of the small things like William now being able to make his own choices. That means you are able to back away from that and let it happen.

 

Your pastor is right, not only is the western world greying but as the congregational average age goes up we are able to provide less and less services. Our church has a few nice ladies who do a pastoral phone calls and hospital and nursing home visits but no longer people who grannysit or provide meals or any practical help. I as one of them am now occupied with my own personal caring role.

 

She is maybe wrong about the tsunami hitting making a difference, the best crisis management is preparedness so we better educate the young to help the old now or many will not see the need to help or have the necessary skills to do so.

 

Sue.

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