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Walking


LadyRose

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I've got to tell you,learning to walk again has not been as instinctual as it was the first time (at age? 12 months?)At the age of 56 for adults without brain injury,it's second nature, right? Not something that you think about, you just do it. Not the case when your muscles have gone to sleep, though, which is what it's been like for me. Limp muscles do not hold up the rest of the body! Physical Therapy (PT) not only helped to get my muscles working again, it also helped with my brain's need to form new pathways to properly move those muscles enabling me to walk. One therapist told me that walking is actually a continued act of stopping ourselves from falling. If you look at a child learning to walk, not only does he fall a lot in the process, he uses his arms (holding them out or up and constantly moving) to balance. So considering that I essentially have no arms to help me to balance(my right and unaffected arm is busy using my quad cane to support me and my left, affected arm I keep in a sling against my body while standing or walking so it doesn't just dangle) and stop myself from falling, I'd say that I'm doing really well at learning to walk for the second time in my life! For the past 4 days, I've had pain in my left, affected foot so I had it checked out by a physician last night, since I had to go out anyway for lab work. Nothing wrong with the bones so I'm using moist heat to see if that will alleviate the pain. Not so convenient when one can't walk (to the bathroom or anywhere) without orthotic equipment and that equipment must be removed to apply heat.

 

 

Short post today, just to get something written but I'm hoping to get future posts about Bathrooms,Clothing, Wheelchairs and Feeling Vulnerable.

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Rose :

 

your post reminds me of my beginning days of therapy. I am now close to 10 years on this post stroke journey & I can tell you walking has become second nature to me & have not to think about all things involved in it any more. I feel for me treadmill therapy has helped big time.

 

Asha

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Hi Rose, I remember learning to walk with the pain in my left side and using a cane. It was hard, and I felt worse then a baby. See a baby was so happy to learn this new skill, me I would take, a few steps then fall into a chair With no smile on my face!. It took me about a year and an half to walk and feel like it was second nature to me. Keep it up Rose!

 

Yvonne

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I too came home from my long hospital initial stay unable to walk on my own and in a WC! After more therapy I soon learned to walk with a cane. I never fell and was always very careful where I placed my left foot since it was paralyzed.

 

I never looked back and got my scooter shortly thereafter!! Hey, I thought I was King of the Road thin.

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Guest lwisman

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I also had to learn to walk again. Early at the rehab hospital a physical therapist asked me if I really wanted to walk again. I guess she was see how I was struggling. I was shocked by the question. It had never occurred to me that I might not walk again. Geesh. Anyway soon after being released from hospitals (4 months and 3 weeks after the stroke) my caregiver began taking me out in the wheelchair for a "walk" across the street on a university campus.. Soon I began practicing walking outside. I would get out of my wheelchair onto my walker. My caregiver followed with the wheelchair. I started with 10 steps the first day. Every day I added steps until I had so many it made sense to move to distance (laps on an oval walkway).

 

I now (weather permitting) take hour long walks on my own. It took a lot of persistence, but it does get easier. I am really glad I kept at it. Being able to walk increases your independence and what you can do.

 

One day on the university campus a priest came up (it is a catholic university) and told me how he had been watching from his office and had used me as an example in a homilly. Yikes. You never know.

 

Keep up the work! It is definitely worth it.

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I also had to learn to walk again. Early at the rehab hospital a physical therapist asked me if I really wanted to walk again. I guess she was see how I was struggling. I was shocked by the question. It had never occurred to me that I might not walk again. Geesh. Anyway soon after being released from hospitals (4 months and 3 weeks after the stroke) my caregiver began taking me out in the wheelchair for a "walk" across the street on a university campus.. Soon I began practicing walking outside. I would get out of my wheelchair onto my walker. My caregiver followed with the wheelchair. I started with 10 steps the first day. Every day I added steps until I had so many it made sense to move to distance (laps on an oval walkway).I now (weather permitting) take hour long walks on my own. It took a lot of persistence, but it does get easier. I am really glad I kept at it. Being able to walk increases your independence and what you can do. One day on the university campus a priest came up (it is a catholic university) and told me how he had been watching from his office and had used me as an example in a homilly. Yikes. You never know.Keep up the work! It is definitely worth it.

 

Thank you for this very inspirational story of your walking progress! :-)

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